12

There are innumerable differences in daily life. The clearest example is 애교: while dramatized on TV, it is omnipresent in most informal situations involving female speakers. Men largely avoid any kind of 애교 for fear of appearing feminine. (Note: 애교 prevalence and level is highly variable depending on the speaker background(s) and situation, especially age.) ...


8

Learning any language can be difficult. That being said, Korean can be quite a challenge if you are only used to reading romanized characters. Learning the Korean alphabet would be the first step which you have already started to learn and study. As you mentioned, next would be pronunciation and with this new challenge the learning curve becomes a more ...


8

http://18children.president.pa.go.kr/mobile/our_space/fairy_tales.php This is the website serviced by the government of South Korea. 100 kinds of Korean fairy tales are provided. Since this website is targeting children, vocabularies and grammar are easy to understand. (Elementary school student level)


7

시 is always pronounced "shi." The issue of "si" versus "shi" is one of romanization. In some romanization systems, ㅅ is always transcribed as "s," regardless of what vowel follows. So "시" would be written as "si" in such a system. But, the pronunciation of 시 is singularly "shi." However, syllables such as 수, 사, 소, etc. are pronounced "su," "sa," and "so" ...


7

This is called 구개음화 (palatalization), and it's one of several assimilation rules in Korean. It occurs when ㄷ or ㅌ is in the 받침, and is followed by a syllable beginning with 이: 같- + 이 = 같이 [가치] 굳- + 이 = 굳이 [구지] In the example you've given, the ㄷ + ㅎ combination produce [ㅌ] sound, but since it is followed by the 이 sound, palatalization occurs, resulting in [...


6

-(으)ㄴ attached to a verb is one of two: 앞말이 관형어 구실을 하게 하고, 사건이나 행위가 과거 또는 말하는 이가 상정한 기준 시점보다 과거에 일어남을 나타내는 어미. A verb ending which lets the verb act as a noun modifier, and indicates that the action or event happen in the past, or before a certain point the speaker has set. 어제 떠난 사람 앞말이 관형어 구실을 하게 하고 사건이나 행위가 완료되어 그 상태가 유지되고 있음을 나타내는 어미.A ...


6

I can tell you right now. (Always) Voiced: all vowels, ㄴ, ㅁ, ㅇ(final), ㄹ (Conditionally) Voiceless: ㄱ, ㄲ, ㄷ, ㄸ, ㅂ, ㅃ, ㅅ, ㅆ, ㅈ, ㅉ, ㅊ, ㅋ, ㅌ, ㅍ, ㅎ (Strongly) Aspirated: ㅋ, ㅌ, ㅍ, ㅅ, ㅊ, ㅎ Not (strongly) aspirated: ㄱ, ㄷ, ㅂ, ㅈ Not aspirated: ㄲ, ㄸ, ㅃ, ㅆ, ㅉ Note that Korean doesn't really phonemically contrast voicing, so it's not weird if a voiced consonant ...


6

Let's look at the dictionary definitions first. -냐 (‘이다’의 어간, 용언의 어간 또는 어미 ‘-으시-’, ‘-었-’, ‘-겠-’ 뒤에 붙어)  해라할 자리에 쓰여, 물음을 나타내는 종결 어미. -나 (주로 동사 어간이나 어미 ‘-으시-’, ‘-었-’, ‘-겠-’ 뒤에 붙어) 하게할 자리에 쓰여, 물음을 나타내는 종결 어미. 자네 언제 떠나나? 자기 스스로에게 묻는 물음이나 추측을 나타내는 종결 어미. 얼굴이 붉어서 난 자네가 술을 마셨나 했어. -는가 (‘있다’, ‘없다’, ‘...


6

여기 있습니다 is idiomatic, translates to "here you go". 세 권 있습니다 is "there are three", so it's a bit unnatural to say that in that situation.


6

When we read the word 옷이 slowly, the 받침 ㅅ is pronounced as ㄷ. No, it's not. It's always pronounced [오시], no matter how slow you read it. Unless somehow the 이 part was obscured while 옷 was being read, so you couldn't infer the batchim's sound value until 이 was revealed. Reading 옷이 as [오디] is wrong. You move the final consonant to the next syllable's initial ...


6

Of course, "nunya" and "it's none of your business" are pretty impolite even in an informal setting, but should you wish to offend and defend, this is the way: 남이야 "nunya" (남이사 is a common colloquial variant) 상관하지 마 "none of your business" 너의 문제가 아니야 "it's not your problem" Also, these are potential ...


6

자차 (自車) means "own car". It's normally heard in the expression 자차보험 "own car insurance" - which means auto insurance in which your own car is covered. I haven't heard it used outside of that expression though.


6

Nosy means '참견하기 좋아하는' in dictionary. So, a nosy person can be translated into '참견쟁이' because -쟁이 is a suffix which has the meaning 'someone who does or prefers something' (e.g. 개구쟁이, 그림쟁이, 이발쟁이) Or, an idiom '오지랖이 넓다' also means 'being nosy'. So if you describe someone with this idiom, then it means that person is a quite nosy one. There is also a slang '...


6

For strangers being approached in real life, 반말 is never an option. 존댓말 is obligatory, and is mostly 해요체 - informal (as this isn't a business meeting) but polite. However, whether you need honorificity (e.g. the 시 infix) is debatable. The context would mean that the topic of conversation would never involve the stranger anyway, and that should give you an ...


6

I suppose it's whoever decided to start writing 김 as Kim and 이 as Lee's fault for making this annoying pronunciation issue. Possibly! But Romanisation of Korean isn't easy. There's no one-to-one mapping between Roman letters and Korean sounds; Different languages that use the Roman alphabet pronounce the letters differently, and within those languages, ...


6

First, try not to learn Korean (or any other language) using automatic translators. They have many errors and frequently omit subtle nuances altogether. So if you try to answer "How are phrase X and Y different?" using these translators, you will end up chasing random noise. In "서울에는 인사동이 있어요", the topic is Seoul. It is more alike "In Seoul, there is ...


5

Not very common (I think), but many people show this behavior with different reasons. Korean has formal speech forms. Minors must use formal speech form in conversation with seniors. Between civilians, number one rule is the age. But there are other hierarchies: office rank, school seniority, gender(!), and so on. Suppose there are two office workers with ...


5

I can't see a situation where this conversation will take place with these exact phrases and honorific conjugations, but let me take a stab at why (a) is better than (b). Since the question is, "Shall I...?" it is awkward to say, "yes, let's!" and a better teaching premise to answer with a "yes, you are requested to do so [i am requesting you to do so]".


5

In addition to WEBjuju's answers, if you want to sound polite, you can say "제가 알아서 할게요" (I'll take care of it myself). It's not always applicable, and in some situations it may still hurt the other person's feelings, but at least on the surface it sounds polite. NOTE: 할게요 must be pronounced as "할께요".


5

The most natural way to say "I was born in 1976" would be: 저는 (천 구백)칠십육년생입니다. N년생 means "born in the year N". You can omit the "천 구백" part since it's obvious. As slang / colloquialism, some people shorten it as far as: 나 칠육년생이야 / 나 칠육이야


4

On -나, we need to distinguish at least two different types of situation. In type I, it is used between two equals. A: 가 보았나? B: 난 아직 못 가 보았네. A군, 자네는 가 보았나? You see this type of use in the movies set against the sixties (perhaps) or earlier. It gives you the sense that both men are on terms of equality and mutual respect. (This does not ...


4

Men are more likely to use the formal style endings (스)ㅂ니다/ㅂ니까 mixed in here and there. Also, mainly men really still use the Familiar or 하네 Style. (indicative 하네, suggestion 하세, question 하나, command 하게, retrospective statement 하데, retrospective question 하디) but this is becoming increasingly rare these days, I hear (except for 네 which now really is more of ...


4

This is an interesting question. I hope that one day someone, more qualified than me, will devise an effective learning path that we can offer (to absolute beginners) as a "standard path to learn Korean" here on stackexchange. Meanwhile, I can tell you how I'm facing this task. I have to go to the Republic of Korea for a few weeks, next summer, and I'm ...


4

잘 is /t͜ɕal/. /jal/ would be 얄. Remember, /j/ is a "yes"-sound, not a ㅈ sound. That being said, the reason why you're hearing /l/ as [i] or [j] is probably because the Korean /l/ at the end of a syllable tends to be realized as [ɭ], a retroflex lateral approximant. That means it's articulated with the tip of the tongue curled up. That is close to how [j] is ...


4

부탁 is literally translated to request, but more commonly do a favor. 어떤 일을 해 달라고 청하거나 맡기다 It is often used in introductions, but only when you WANT the listener to BENEFIT anyone in anyway. When you are in a competition, you introduce yourself with 잘 부탁드립니다 since the audiences give you appreciation, or even can judge the winner. When you meet someone ...


4

Try to find something broadcasted/recorded that also has a transcript. Take the transcript and completely translate it, or at least, look up every unknown word and difficult/unfamiliar phrase. Now listen to the broadcast/recording and experience hearing what you are expecting to hear. The ability to listen comes from an understanding of expectation of ...


4

You made a good point! As you've said, 한글 is only a writing system, not the language(한국어) itself. But unlike many other writing systems, 한글 was "invented" solely for 한국어, and many Koreans feel very proud about this. Plus, you don't really use 한글 to write down other languages than 한국어. So most Koreans think of 한글 and 한국어 as the same. Still, strictly saying, ...


4

지 is noun of uncertainty, and is used to express a clause that is originally a question. In your sentence, 이렇게 오늘은 다른 사람에게 어떻게 제안하는지를 공부할 거예요 The clause is 다른 사람에게 어떻게 제안하다, which is "how do we propose to others". In this case we will use the noun of uncertainty 지 since the clause is originally a question(i.e. there is a WH word 어떻게). So the sentence ...


4

선배 and 후배 are normally used with someone who is attending the same school or a member of the same organization or company. Then, 선배 is used for someone who has been at that school or organization longer, and 후배 for someone who joined later. For example, regardless of age, a 2nd year university student will call a 3rd year student 선배. Likewise, a newer ...


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