12

Good afternoon! 다이 and 쓰메끼리 are not standard words (which are in a dictionary) so we avoid using them. As you already mentioned, they are actually not Korean but Japanese vocabularies. If there were no Korean words for them then they would be able to become standard words (maybe), but there are already good Korean words for them so there is no reason for ...


10

These are actually the same story grammatically as the 좋다 versus 좋아하다 case. 싫다 means to be despicable or worthy of hate, to be awful. This is a descriptive verb. 싫어하다 means to hate; it is an action verb. Koreans commonly will say things like ”싫어!" when they want to express displeasure about something. It is almost like the English "this sucks.&...


9

It doesn't sound grammatical to me, but I think they're trying to hard to sound "polite" by avoiding a command (imperative) form altogether. There are some such "over-polite" expressions that sound icky to many Koreans yet persist among Korean service providers. The most notorious example is putting "-시" to every subject. For example: 커피 나오셨습니다, or 이 ...


8

Well, if you ever get a job in a Korean environment, you'll get to use it. I understand that your female friend said that she rarely uses it, but it's more common than she thinks. Most females don't get around to using it, probably because there aren't enough 'formal' settings to be in. By 'formal' I mean giving an announcement or presentation, talking to ...


8

Okay, firstly, you can't say you. Should you have to say you, you can't use 너. That's pretty rude. So, then, just leave the you out and let's go on. There are few variants I recommend. 제가 할게요 or 제가 하겠습니다 - I will do it. The other one is more of the "favor" feel. 제가 해 드릴까요? - Shall I do it for you? Or you could force the issue. 제가 해 드리겠습니다 - I'...


8

In addition to Putri's answer, 풋 can also be a prefix that means immature. Some of examples are: 풋사랑 : 풋 + 사랑(love) puppy love 풋사과: 풋 + 사과(apple) unripe apple 풋내기 : rookie 풋내: idiomatically describes young or immature


7

It's complicated... sometimes you can even use both and it changes either the meaning or style of speech. The book Using Korean devotes an entire chapter (about 9 pages) to this topic. Read the full details and numerous examples starting from page 169. I'll try to summarize below (all quotes from Using Korean, examples have been greatly abridged): ...


7

My dictionary says both functions like a conjunction that in English. They could both be translated as 'that' in some circumstances, but I'm not sure that's very useful information, as 'that' is a word with many functions and meanings in English. It might be more useful to remember their function, which is to report speech. English has the concept of ...


7

The particle 은/는 is sometimes used as an emphasiser. Ultimately, you could argue that this is always what it is being used as. Although Korean learners are taught (at least I was) that 은/는 is a subject marker, it really is just being used as a marker that indicates emphasis or weight in a sentence. So, in your example, 휴게실에는 누가 있습니까? is asking who is in ...


7

The 해요체 or '-요' style is polite enough for many situations that you'd find yourself in as tourist in Korea, or if you never go to Korea but only meet Korean friends abroad. In those cases then it may be true that you will never need to be any more formal or polite. The 합쇼체 ('-ㅂ니다') style is used in formal situations including the ones you mentioned, when ...


7

Not sure if this matches what you want, but there's a word 담백하다. It means "lacking (unnecessary) strong taste", i.e., not too salty, not spiced, no (or very little) peppers, etc. It is also a very positive word. For example, you could say "이 물김치는 담백해서 좋아요." for a white (or nearly white) kimchi. You'd probably not want to use the word for ordinary 배추김치.


6

There's some overlap between them and the nuances are difficult, but I think some major differences can be summarized as: 목적 is often the objective or purpose of something. It is thus often used in form X의 목적, meaning the purpose of X: 인생의 목적 (the purpose of life) 안전의 목적으로 ... (for the purpose of safety) 이 연구의 목적은 ... (The purpose of this study is ...) ...


6

I think what you heard is "몇 신어요?", literally "What size do you wear?". A more general phrase would be "신발 사이즈가 어떻게 되세요?" "What is your shoe size?" In banmal, "신발 몇 신어?" / "신발 사이즈 얼마야?"


6

님 is practically the standard way to address people's usernames on the Internet. I've never seen/used 씨 before, though.


6

1. You can use '권' for books, '부' for either books and newspaper. I've never thought about difference between '부' and '권'. So I researched about it. First of all, let's search them at Naver dictionary. 권 (卷) 1. 책을 세는 단위. 낚시에 관한 책을 세 권만 추천해 주십시오. 그 가방에 소설 책 한 권이 들어 있었다. 책상 위에는 교과서말고도 다른 책이 몇 권 눈에 띈다. 부 (部) 2. 신문(...


6

It's not very common in Korea to use foot (feet) as height measurement. They usually use 센티미터 (centimeter) instead of foot. Example, 180센티/180센티미터. 풋 itself has various types of meaning . The most common word "풋" Koreans use is a slang which describes a sound of bursting out laughing or unbearable laughter. Hope it helps!


6

고수 : expert 중수(joong soo) : intermediate 하수(ha soo) : beginner However, in the same way, 초보(chobo) is typically more used as Ha Soo 고/중/하 mean high/mid/low. 수 means a hand which could mean a level in some case. These words are very old but still popular in Go, martial art or video games.


6

I enjoyed the link that @Display-name left in his/her answer, but I thought I would go ahead and display from that large page of Korean what I believe to be the one passage that (is a pangram that can be used to type all the characters to test if a keyboard is fully operational). This passage of a question and answer (in 2.1, third bullet from end) uses ...


6

Korean, like many other Eastern Asian languages and cultures, are rooted in Chinese origins. 원 is Korean transcription of Hanja - 圓 which derives from Chinese character of the same shape. This is used most commonly in a written and formal context - meaning is not restricted to a physical shape of a circle but a figurative sense. In addition, it can easily be ...


6

Even though their meaning is similar, they don't always appear with the same syntax: 실제 is more often used to modify the following noun (실제 상황, 실제 구성, etc.). 현실 is less commonly used in such a way: 현실 세계 means the real world, but I can't think of others. Regarding meanings, 현실 is often "reality" in the sense "the harsh reality", "...


6

임금 means 'pay'. It includes all kinds of income; annual pay, monthly pay, weekly wage, daily wage and hourly wage. 시급 only means hourly wage. Thus, 최저임금 means minimum wage and 최저시급 means minimum hourly wage. However, 최저임금 and 최저시급 are used much in the same sense.


5

Explaining 아무도 as "nobody" is a bit misleading. 아무 is translatable to "any" and "anyone". 아무 말이나 해 봐라. say anything. 아무나 할 수 있습니다. anybody can do it. 아무 때나 찾아와. come find me anytime. And, of course it can be used with 가(although this usage is rare), or any other particle in that matter: 고집 세거나 영악스러운 데는 없어도, 아무가 보아도 순하고 말썽 없는 아이로 생긴 모습이었다. (...


5

As you say, 미안 합니다 and 죄송합니다 aren't quite right, as they're more for taking responsibility for your own actions. In my local culture (UK), we often respond by showing concern and asking some somewhat 'matter-of-fact' questions about the situation - e.g. "had he been ill for a long time?" (오래 편찮으셨습니까?), and this approach could be appropriate in Korean too. ...


5

Another negative one is 탓: (because / by fault of). It can be used after a verb in the form Verb+ㄴ/는 탓, or after a noun, usually Noun의 탓. It's usually in the form 탓에 or 탓으로: 늦잠을 잔 탓으로 버스를 놏쳤어요 비 오는 탓에 소풍을 못 가요


5

A positive one is the 덕분에 / 덕택에 construction, meaning "thanks to": 구 선생님 덕택에 한국어를 많이 배웠어요. => Thanks to you, Ms. Koo, I learned a great deal of Korean 흥부 덕분에 제비가 목숨을 구했다. => Thanks to Hŭngbu's help, the swallow survived. Some negative ones: (느)ㄴ 바람에: 늦잠자는 바람에 늦었어. I was late because I slept late 취한 바람에 그는 상관과 다투었다 – under the influence of ...


5

Actually, as a native speaker of the language, '-한' is often used. But it's not something that can be written by itself. It's similar to 'as long as'. 법과 어긋나지 않는 한 기꺼이 양보합니다. Therefore, the above sentence would mean As long as it does not violate the law, we will willingly yield. Another example: 그들이 항복하지 않는 한 우리는 계속 공격할 것입니다. As long as they don't ...


5

대한 is a modifier, whereas 대해서 acts as a conjunction. so -에 대한 will always be followed by a noun, whereas -에 대해서 should be followed by a verb phrase (the verb phrase might begin with a noun, but should end with a verb). In the sentence "인터뷰에 대한 소식이 없어요", "인터뷰에 대한" describes 소식 - we can say "news about the interview". If we can say "Noun about such and such",...


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