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27

To preface my answer, let me first say that I am not myself Korean. I lived in Korea for 2 years and got a degree in Korean, but I obviously do not know every naming practice used in Korea. These are just my personal observations as a non-native speaker. While there is no definitive pattern for naming that I am aware of, there certainly are indicators that ...


19

In general there's no rule. Moreover, there are several names used by both genders. But there are far fewer female names than male names. Feminine names tends to end with a vowel or ends with soft sounds. Also the Hanja (chinese characters) in female names tends to signify beauty (美 아름다울 미,姸 고울 연,淑 맑을 숙) or feminine value (禮 예 예, 智 지혜 지). Here is a list of ...


9

In order to address my own mother, I would use the word "어머니." In order to address someone else's mother, I would use the word "어머님." It comes down to honorific usage; please refer to the section Honorific nouns in the Wikipedia entry on Korean honorifics.


8

나쁜 이름은 아니지만 한국적인 이름은 아니에요. 한국 사람 입장에서 '회춘'이라는 이름을 들었을 때 드는 느낌: 나이가 엄청 많은 할머니 이름 '성춘향'이 살던 고전 시대처럼 되게 옛날 사람 이름 '오원춘'처럼 (별로 좋은 예는 아니지만) 중국계 한국인의 이름 HK Lee님이 말씀하신 것처럼 회춘했다는 말 같아서 웃기기도 하고요. It could be a Korean name but not really a modern one. How a name '회춘' sounds to me: Grandma's name. (aged 120+ y.o.) Someone from the classical era like when there ...


8

Of course! Recently(since about 2000's), making name with original Korean words is a trend between young parents. Their family name is from Hanja, but the names are native Korean words. ex) 이하늬(Actress), 김사랑(Actress), 산다라 박(Singer, 2NE1), 강하늘(Actor), 임슬옹(Singer, 2AM), 구하라(Singer, KARA), ... I found the list of them though it's written in Korean.


7

I'm not an expert in baby-naming, so I hope other people would post better answers (or correct me if I'm wrong!!) A character shared between siblings is called a 돌림자, namely "Shared Character", or 항렬자, meaning "Generation Character". Before I can explain how 돌림자 works, I should first briefly talk about how families work in Korea. You may have noticed how ...


5

Here is a wiki page of all family names in Korea. The common family names among them that be seen these days are '선우', '제갈', '남궁', '황보'.


5

Yes. A rare name though. 심沈 S(h)im 비겸丕謙 Bigyeom An interesting question! Your characters are included in the legal set of hanja for personal names published by the Supreme Court of South Korea, namely “人名用漢字.” And the readings are: 심沈 비丕겸謙 — romanized as “Bigyeom S(h)im.” The surname 심沈 is the thirty-second most common surname in South Korea taking up ...


4

If I write two words you have given, jin-hee is 진희 or less likely 진히 jin-hae is 진해 First of all, 진희 a common last name especially for girls. I can't think of other use cases of 진희 other than a person's name. 진해 can be an adjective of 진하다 meaning dark, thick, deep, or strong. It can also be a name of an administrative district in souther Korea: 진해구 Jinhae-...


4

회춘하다 [回春] : 다시 젊어지다 grow younger When we use another Chinese character 회(return, back to the first position), 회춘 is healing sickness or being vivid. So when someone obtain a young wife, we use frequently. Or when we see someone's energy, we use : "He gets an energy" 그 사람 회춘했어. Usually, when we hear 회춘, then we think this word so that it may be funny.


4

An online method of finding 한글 for 한자: https://hanja.dict.naver.com/ Either draw the Chinese charater on the box given at the right, or copy and paste the character in the text box on the left, and it suggests a list of words using this 한자 as well as it's 한글 equivalent


3

현 is a perfectly normal name. I even know someone with that name. Single-character given names are not that uncommon, and you could find many well-known people with single-character names: 김구 (independence fighter), 신립 (a general in Joseon era), 최영 (another general in Goryeo era), 심훈 (a novelist in the Japanese colony era), 김훈 (a famous contemporary ...


3

As Kayla Kwon has indicated, there are several family names that are two characters. In my comment above, I gave two examples of people that I knew that only had a single character given name. I knew a woman named 양순 (Family name 양, given name 순) as well as a man named 권혁 (Family name 권, given name 혁). While somewhat rare, names of a single character are ...


3

金知桓 김지환 1) 知 : 알 지 => know example : 지성 = intelligence 2) 桓 : 씩씩할 환 => brave


3

The name is 칭기즈 칸 chinggijeu kan. Where does it come from? The name is likely a direct transliteration from Genghis Khan's Mongolian name. According to Wikipedia, the name is pronounced as [t͡ʃʰiŋɡɪs xaːŋ] (IPA) in Mongolian, where Genghis is pretty much pronounced the same as the Korean transliteration except the final s became a 즈, which is also not ...


3

칭기즈 칸 Korea most likely received word of Mongols and their Khans from Chinese, rather than directly. Thus, pronunciation is based on rendering of Middle Mongolian original in Chinese and Chinese characters and then Korean Hanja, 成吉思汗. Edit Apparently Khan names in the past were not always what they are now, consider: 이 ‘황금의 칸’은 《고려사절요(高麗史節要)》에는 ‘금행(金幸)’...


3

아주머니 is the best word for this. 아줌마 is informal and sounds a little immature.


3

Well.. I think only the person, who gave the name, knows the answer. 漢 has a lot of other meanings. As a native Korean, it's not odd to me at all. It's because we don't care about Hanja names much. Most people have Hanja names, though. Namely, we don't care whether he writes his son's name with 漢 or 韓. We are just concerned that his name is '한' which is ...


3

I think you are asking if Koreans named their child based on the hanja meaning or the original word meaning. 강하늘 is an example of name not based on hanja meaning. There are such a trend recently, however there are still some rules when naming which makes all these words convertible to hanja, which is, by now you hardly see a name with (d/t) as the final ...


3

The widespread use of Roman letters does not mean that Koreans can pronounce non-Korean names properly. In addition, there are various languages that use Roman letters; how can a person distinguish them all? At least, I am not a genius to do so. Making a Korean name is different from writing your name in Korean. You were asked to do the latter. Just by ...


2

I think it has become more popular to diverge from the traditional 3 syllable names (1 family name 2 first name). I know people with fewer than 3 and more than 3. Names like 홍솔 or 최아름나라


2

As others have pointed out, they are usually three or rarely two or four blocks long, and in terms of addressing someone, they are suffixed by the honorific -씨. Korean uses word spacing, which makes it very easy to pick out someone's name. Also, for some formal situations, they may be written in Hanja instead. In Terms of English, note that English actually ...


2

I haven't seen this suggested in any particular style guide. A one-off example I can think of is singer 권보아, written in Latin script as BoA. I do write names like this myself sometimes, and agree that it is a good way of writing Korean names, insofar as it preserves the distinction between the Korean syllables while reducing the risk of the second ...


2

In the given Korean sentence, Rob corresponds to 롭, not 롭이. The closest transliteration of the English name Rob /rob/ [ɹ̠ɒb] would be 롭 /rob/ [ɾop̚] according to Korean phonology and phonetics (and also the ROK government standard). 롭이/로비 would sound /robi/ [ɾobi], with a completely unnecessary [i]. The sentence "저는 롭이에요" is decomposed into 저: I(polite) -...


2

First off: TL; DR. Transliterations are preferred. Well-known on’yomi音読み names are sometimes read with Hanja sounds. Foreign words in the Korean language By the standard of the NIKL, you should transliterate foreign names and words into Hangul, preserving their original pronunciations — with some exceptions. The exceptions Japanese words Some on’yomi音読み (“...


1

I think it can be a good strategy to write as the pronunciation of your name 懷春 as 화이천


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