Hot answers tagged

12

The '한자 키' on a Korean keyboard is usually the same key as the one that may be the right 'Ctrl' key on many countries' keyboards. This picture shows the key with both labellings : If you type a hangul character that you want to 'convert' to hanja, and press the '한자 키' while it is highlighted, a menu will come up: This shows the possible hanja for this ...


11

TL;DR version: While Japanese kanji can be be represented by any number of syllables, Korean hanja always represents a single syllable. Korean words of Chinese origin that have had some sound changes applied are not interchangeable with hanja except in rare cases. Some words are Chinese in origin but have been nativized through sound changes. Take this ...


10

I'm a native Korean in early 30s. Hanja (Hanja in Korea, Hanzi in China, Kanji in Japan) levels of "ordinary native Korean speakers" vary greatly. Some people know a lot, and also many people know merely a few. So thinking about average would not be much useful. For your examples, I think almost every Korean will know "여", "남", "대" and "소" ("女", "男", "大", ...


10

First of all, they are used for graphical purposes. It's an easy way to make a more catchy design. Second, it can give more impact to the meaning. 한자 like 茶 (차 - tea) are well-known even to Koreans who didn't learn much 한자, and it really stands out in a label with lots of 한글 (it wouldn't stand out if there were a lot of 한자, but when there are only one or ...


9

No. There are some adverbs (부사) that are 한자어: 역시 (亦是) - also, likewise 내일 (來日) - tomorrow (this is sometimes a noun, sometimes an adverb) 심지어 (甚至於) - even as far as 항상 (恒常) - always Also, numbers are considered to be 수사 or 관형사, not 명사, so the numbers 일, 이, 삼 etc. are all 한자어. I could find one other 관형사 that is a 한자어: 순 (純) - pure: 순 한국식 (pure Korean-...


9

This seems true in North Korean media, though I can't say what's taught in their schools. As I understand, 한자 (Hanja) was no longer in use in 북한 (DPRK, aka North Korea) by the end of the Korean War, and upheld this way as the regime wants to maintain a monolithic culture among its people. To substantiate this somewhat, it is even strongly frowned upon (if ...


8

Every hanja is exactly one syllable, no exceptions. No sound change made hanja pronunciation vary in syllable length since when hanja came to Korea(which is a looong time ago).


8

I can imagine only these situations... If you want to be a lawyer in Korea. Some law terms are written in ancient Korean (and getting replaced with Hangul representation) If you want to study ancient Korean history. If you have academic interest in historic Korean language. Usually, you have no need to deal with Hanja unless you are dealing with some very ...


7

Just answering Q1: Naver's dictionary lists six words. However, among them, 奇計 is a very rare word. I'm not even sure if I've seen it anywhere, although I might understand the term if I saw it in the right context. The others (氣界/棋界/碁界/器界) are even more rare: I'm sure I've never seen them. ...which leaves us with the two common Hanja spellings, 機械 and 器械....


7

One example of where Hanja might be used is to disambiguate homonyms. For example, 사과 can mean an apology, or an apple. The Hanja - 謝過, or 沙果 - might be used to clarify which is meant.


7

First, Hangeul was not originally written as Kanji. Kanji is the term for Chinese characters used in the Japanese language; Hanja is the term for these characters used in Korean language. Hangeul is another writing system for Korean. 不 actually has 2 pronunciations in Korean: 불 and 부. This can be traced back to Middle Chinese, where the pronunciation ...


6

Probably you know that a Hanja character may have more than one pronunciation. For example, 樂 has seven different pronunciations, 락, 악, 낙, 요, 료, 록, 로. (낙 is derived by the word-initial rule 두음법칙 applied to 락. 료, 록, 로 are very rare readings which have few usage, mostly for reading particular phrases in classical Chinese texts.) When a Hanja character can be ...


6

So, you wanted etymology, right? Well, every words you wrote is sino-Korean, which means it is composed with Chinese character. Let's start with 사원. 사원 is 社員 in Chinese character. 社 means 'to meet', and it is also 사 of 회사. 員 means 'number of people'(인원), and it can be used as meaning of member. (조직원 : gang member) Next is 주임. At Korean dictionary, it says ...


6

In this case, it's because of 두음 법칙 (Initial sound rule), which forbids ㄹ and 냐/녀/뇨/뉴/니 at a word-initial position. ㄹ becomes ㄴ, and 냐/녀/뇨/뉴/니 becomes 야/여/요/유/이 when it's placed in front of a word. Of course, loanwords are an exception (e.g., English radio -> 라디오 (NOT 나디오), Japanese ニス nisu -> 니스 (NOT 이스)). 력(力) turns into 역 when it is the first syllable of ...


6

I'm not an expert on old Korean, but some of them look recognizable. 집 떠난 날 = day of departure from home 서울 떠난 날 = day of departure from Seoul 상해 착(着?) = arrive at Shanghai? 상해 발(發) = departure form Shanghai? 마르세이유 상륙(上陸) = arrive at Marseilles I think, there were no standard Hanguel grammar at that time. Not even the official language of the nation. ...


5

There are 2136 chinese characters that Japanese use daily. Higher level Kanji goes up to 6000+ characters. Some of them are in simplified form which typical Koreans might not be familiar with. In South Korea, at the elementary school level, students are expected to learn around 500 characters. At the middle school level, cumulative of 900 characters. ...


5

The rule of dropping ㄹ is only applicable to 한자 or 이름. And only for surnames or the first word, so usually we wouldn't drop ㄹ for 련 in your example. That's why you will still see some words which keep ㄹ. Examples are 리모트(remote), or other 외국어 명사 There are some surnames which do not follow this rule, like 류(柳). I think it is because there is another surname ...


5

The character 韓 for the name of Korea was arbitrarily chosen for its sound, coincidentally being the same character of some ancient Chinese states. The first thing to point out is that there is rarely any Chinese character that was invented solely as a name for a people. Among the historical Chinese-character using countries and regions, their earliest ...


5

Doesn't look like it. Both morphemes are of non-Sinitic origin as given by Naver dic, made up of (달 + ㄴ) > 단 (sweet; see Etymology #7 of 달다) 비 (rain) These are their modern representations of course, for the etymology of 달다 see the Naver dic entry with the 아래아 (ㆍ)


4

Pretty much never. Some newspapers use hanja to clarify homonyms (장기: 長期 long-term, 臟器 viscera, 將棋 Korean chess, 長技 specialty, etc.) but usually it's not hard to figure out the meaning through context. It does help to learn some hanja, though, because you can sometimes figure out the meaning of a word by guessing the hanja. Also, some of the basic hanja is ...


4

Shortest answer will be 'yes, it has'. According to Korean Wikipedia(https://ko.wikipedia.org/wiki/%EC%B7%A8%EC%9D%8C) it is called '취음(chui-um)' or '군두목(goondumock)'. One of the most well-known examples is how we call USA: 미국(美國), meaning 'beautiful country' but that is totally not intended. When Chinese people heard 'America' a few centuries ago, they ...


4

An online method of finding 한글 for 한자: https://hanja.dict.naver.com/ Either draw the Chinese charater on the box given at the right, or copy and paste the character in the text box on the left, and it suggests a list of words using this 한자 as well as it's 한글 equivalent


4

In the second photo,「絞筒」refers to the barrel of the gun. In the first photo, the unknown character looks like「⿱人布」. I suggest that this is a slightly altered way of writing 「⿱𠂉布」, since the shape「人」is sometimes altered to「𠂉」at the top of characters: At least in Chinese records, this is a variant of either「布」or「希」. If it's「布」, it ...


4

音訓 (음훈) or 訓音 (훈음) is short for 音讀 (음독) + 訓讀 (훈독), referring to the short dictionary gloss given to Chinese characters by Korean dictionaries. It is typically formatted in the following order: 國 (漢字) 나라 (訓讀) 국 (音讀) where 訓讀 is a Korean translation (usually, but not always, using pure Korean words) of the character, and 音讀 is either the widely accepted ...


4

It depends on the criteria. I have made my own list (separated into 1 and 2) using a programming language and the words contained in the standard dictionary (March 2020), with the following conditions: Words like loanwords and old Hangul words, phrases, and proverbs are all excluded (They have no prescribed pronunciations). Simple rules regarding 겹받침, 구개음화, ...


4

Short answer: You can write "bzach" using English letters, and pronounce it, but such a syllable is nowhere to be found in the language. There are plenty of such "gaps", but generally, most of them are unexplainable. Long answer: However, we can explain some of them: 댜 / 탸 / 됴 / 툐 These syllable did exist in the Middle Korean period (...


3

Well.. I think only the person, who gave the name, knows the answer. 漢 has a lot of other meanings. As a native Korean, it's not odd to me at all. It's because we don't care about Hanja names much. Most people have Hanja names, though. Namely, we don't care whether he writes his son's name with 漢 or 韓. We are just concerned that his name is '한' which is ...


3

Just adding some established usages to the list: 比(비) for the Philippines. 韓-比 FTA 추진…11월 체결 목표 西(서) for Spain. 西 언론 '이강인 준우승, 세계는 그의 발 앞에 있다' 蘇(소) for the Soviet Union. 승인 받자마자 유엔 가입 신청… 蘇 거부권 행사로 무산 越(월) for Vietnam. 北·越 우호 행보 계속…리용호, 베트남 외교관 만찬 주최 印(인) for India. 모디 印 총리 재집권 눈앞…‘7%대 성장’ 모디노믹스 탄력받을까 印尼(인니) for Indonesia. 일본에 연거푸 당한 한국셔틀콕, 印尼오픈 빈작에 그쳐 泰(태) ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible