7

The name is written in Hanja as 李 which is pronounced as Lǐ in Chinese. Wikipedia has some information on why the spelling Lee is so common Though the official Revised Romanization spelling of this surname is I, South Korea's National Institute of the Korean Language noted in 2001 that one-letter surnames were quite rare in English and other ...


6

My understanding from talking with some people of the family name 박, as well as studying some history of Koreans in the U.S.A, is as follows: When Koreans began coming (primarily) to the United States, they were of course asked to register their name with the immigration officials. When 박씨 Koreans were asked their name, they likely responded in one of ...


4

I deem that you already know the correct romanization is u when you follow the official Korean language romanization system. I would say that there are several reasons for using woo instead of oo and u, but others might disagree at some points: A lot of people want to conform to the custom. It is an idiomatic transliteration going against the official (...


2

I always considered it an 'English distortion effect' when trying to nail down the sound from Korean to English as close as possible. Words in English that don't have any consonants look weird (이 -> Ee?), while Yi or Lee provide a very similar sound, but distort it a bit to make the word more readable.


2

I haven't seen this suggested in any particular style guide. A one-off example I can think of is singer 권보아, written in Latin script as BoA. I do write names like this myself sometimes, and agree that it is a good way of writing Korean names, insofar as it preserves the distinction between the Korean syllables while reducing the risk of the second ...


1

Might be the prefix "되-" (pronounced somewhat like "dweh"). It's not a word in itself, but means "again" or "re-". E.g., 되풀이 repetition, 되감다 rewind, 되돌림 undo (from "turn again"), etc. 되- is usually attached to a verb (or a noun made from a verb), so attaching it to 올가미 (a specific kind of trap) sounds a bit strange to me, but I guess that's not impossible ...


1

seureopgo 서럽다(seureopda): to be sorrowful (https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%EC%84%9C%EB%9F%BD%EB%8B%A4) 서럽고(seureopgo): changed form of 서럽다. (=서럽다 그리고(and)) eopji 없지: doesn't exist danghaetgo 당하다(danghada): to suffer or undergo something (https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%EB%8B%B9%ED%95%98%EB%8B%A4) 당했다(danghaetda): past tense of 당하다 당했고(danghaetgo): (=당했다 ...


1

1) Note that there are Ye, Yi, Lee, Rhee etc for family name 이. But 98 percent use Lee (cf. user17915's answer) China : 리, Korean-writing : 리 and English : Lee is changed into China : 리 and Korean-writing : 이 At that time, we do not change English writing personally, because we do not use English name frequently. 2) English-writing rule of Korean ...


1

When I was teaching ESL in Korea, I asked one of my adult students about the last name 이, pronounced like the letter ' e' and why did they change the pronunciation and spelling to Lee. He offered this answer: If we told people that our family name was 'E' it would be hard to write in English without confusion and if it was a man he would be 'Mr.E' and it ...


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