11

Koreaboo means people who are great fans of Korean pop culture, almost maniacal. But unlike 'K-pop fan', Koreaboo has a little bit of a disparaging nuance. In Korean, 팬 just means a fan. When degrading crazy fans, (e.g. 14-year-old Justin Bieber fans) -빠 is used. 축(구)빠 means football(축구) fan, 야(구)빠 means baseball(야구) fan and 엑소빠 means fans of Exo, a K-pop ...


10

The traditional way of counting age is like this: You are 1 years old (한 살) when you're born. You gain a year on January 1st. So technically, a baby born in December will become 두 살 - two years old - on January 1st. However, for children that young, they normally count their age by days, weeks or months (just like in English). Also, sometimes age of ...


10

Okay, while @ting-choe has my gratitude for something that may level me up (my wife says I will "never understand" 김소월의 진달래꽃 - I think some "easier" poems (for my level) are in order here (and my Korean wife can recite these, too, so they must not be random). **산토끼** 산토끼 토끼야 어디를 가느냐 깡총깡총 뛰면서 어디를 가느냐 산고개 고개를 나혼자 넘어서 토실토실 알밤을 주워 올테야 **닭** 귀여운 꼬마가 닭장에 가서 암탉을 ...


9

진달래꽃 - 김소월 나 보기가 역겨워 가실 때에는 말없이 고이 보내 드리우리다 영변에 약산 진달래꽃 아름 따다 가실 길에 뿌리우리다 가시는 걸음 걸음 놓인 그 꽃을 사뿐히 즈려밟고 가시옵소서 나 보기가 역겨워 가실 때에는 죽어도 아니 눈물 흘리우리다 If someone doesn't know this poem, he or she is not South Korean. Here is a link to the translation for this poem https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kim_Sowol


7

Koreans consider newborns to be one year of age. So, anyone born in 2016 would be one year old. Furthermore, everyone turns a year older every New Year's day. In the event that a baby is born on December 31st, 2016, he or she would be two years old on January 1st, 2017. So, as for your example, that person born in 1986 would currently be 31 years old. ...


7

The name is written in Hanja as 李 which is pronounced as Lǐ in Chinese. Wikipedia has some information on why the spelling Lee is so common Though the official Revised Romanization spelling of this surname is I, South Korea's National Institute of the Korean Language noted in 2001 that one-letter surnames were quite rare in English and other ...


6

Of course, "nunya" and "it's none of your business" are pretty impolite even in an informal setting, but should you wish to offend and defend, this is the way: 남이야 "nunya" (남이사 is a common colloquial variant) 상관하지 마 "none of your business" 너의 문제가 아니야 "it's not your problem" Also, these are potential ...


6

For strangers being approached in real life, 반말 is never an option. 존댓말 is obligatory, and is mostly 해요체 - informal (as this isn't a business meeting) but polite. However, whether you need honorificity (e.g. the 시 infix) is debatable. The context would mean that the topic of conversation would never involve the stranger anyway, and that should give you an ...


5

In addition to WEBjuju's answers, if you want to sound polite, you can say "제가 알아서 할게요" (I'll take care of it myself). It's not always applicable, and in some situations it may still hurt the other person's feelings, but at least on the surface it sounds polite. NOTE: 할게요 must be pronounced as "할께요".


5

Before starting my answer, I would like to mention I don't have a professional knowledge in Korean, but I would like to share what I think as a native speaker. For the first question, whether ~스럽다 means worthy of ~, I will not say it is totally wrong, but I do not agree. I would like say the meaning of '~스럽다' is more closer to 'be (like) ~', or ' as like ~'. ...


5

That's an old song, I think. To understand the phrase, you should note that the five colors (red, black, blue, yellow and white) represent Five Elements. Affected by religions such as Taoism and Buddhism, Korean shamanism also uses five colors (red, green, blue, yellow and white). To keep it simple, I'd say those strings or similar things (flags, ribbons, ...


4

Others already wrote good answers. I will just add two more equations to help calculating Korean age from international age. Your Korean age is: (1) if your birthday has been passed, your international age + 1; (2) if your birthday has not been passed yet, your international age + 2.


4

선배 and 후배 are normally used with someone who is attending the same school or a member of the same organization or company. Then, 선배 is used for someone who has been at that school or organization longer, and 후배 for someone who joined later. For example, regardless of age, a 2nd year university student will call a 3rd year student 선배. Likewise, a newer ...


3

As a Korean, I can translate it into English like this: Oh~~~ hello You can just respond "안녕하세요", but "네~ 안녕하세요" sounds more friendly and is used more often. In this expression, '네' is basically used to respond affirmatively (positively) to someone. (polite form) It has a emotional meaning - to tell someone that you are hearing affirmatively, and ...


3

Just to add, a very strong but directly translated phrase is "너 알 바 아니야." (pronounced as [너 알빠 아니야]) You should only use this phrase to friends, and only when you want to express anger or distress. However, as a native Korean, I think this is the most precise translation for 'none of your business.'


3

There wouldn't be a simple single word that someone of Korean cultural assumptions would understand to mean what you want. You'd probably have to be explicit and say 고모의 와이프/고모의 아내 for 'Father's sister's wife', and or 삼촌 의 남편/삼촌 의 바깥분 for 'Father's younger brother's husband'. Of course within the family or among people who are familiar with the situation, ...


3

Asking for someone to do spotting for you isn't inappropriate(of course), but ask your trainer/coach(if there is one) or someone you have become friendly with, rather than asking some random person. Korean people are not that used to talking with strangers, and will probably show bewilderment. I would recommend that you either take a friend with you, or find ...


3

It is depends on family. In 설날 there is moment that elder family start putting money to empty envelope. Elder family IMO (30 year old above or have a job at least) usually give kids some pocket money. elementary school - $30 middle school - $50ish high school ~ $100 also it depends on how rich your family are, I heard someone got $1,000ish from grand ...


3

'세배'is special type of '절'. Having '절' at '구정'(Jan first in luna calendar) is called '세배'. So I'll interpret 'deep bow' as '절' from now on. Here is description for '세배' in korean dictionary. 아침 일찍이 남녀노소가 모두 새옷(설빔)으로 갈아입고, 차례를 지낸 뒤에 자리를 정리하여 앉는다. 그리고는 조부모·부모에게 먼저 절하고, 형·누나 등 차례로 아랫사람이 윗사람에게 절을 하여 새해 첫인사를 드린다. 그리고 차례를 지낸 설음식으로 아침식사를 마친 뒤에는 일가친척과 이웃어른을 ...


3

If a student fails to gain entrance to college, he/she has several choices: 재수 means "study again" literally, 유학 means "go abroad to study", or 취업/취직 means "take a job". The Korean college entrance exam is called 수능, the abbreviation for 대학수학능력시험. This exam carries the same meaning as the SAT. In Korea, taking a job is not an option for most of the ...


3

For conversational Korean between adults in informal situations, I would agree with HK Lee that the most useful style to become comfortable with is the haseo / haeyo style. This can be called 해요체 ('Haeyoche'), and is considered a polite but informal style. I guess that means my answer is 'no' - it's not necessarily better to learn a formal style first. One ...


3

There are Korean expressions which mean that the opponents' parents passed away. For example, you can ask a question, "Are your parents well?" It seems that the sentence is very normal, but the intention of the phrase is to say that the listener's parents are not well. These are used in chats very frequently. What (2) means is to prevent such expression, ...


3

There have quite a few studies in Korean and in English of the rise of the modern South Korean entertainment industry, with particular emphasis on the now global rise of K-pop. As with most musical genres, certain features are easily gleaned from a sample of music recognised as trot. Its origins are intertwined with most early 20th-century popular music, ...


3

The widespread use of Roman letters does not mean that Koreans can pronounce non-Korean names properly. In addition, there are various languages that use Roman letters; how can a person distinguish them all? At least, I am not a genius to do so. Making a Korean name is different from writing your name in Korean. You were asked to do the latter. Just by ...


2

Just as an alternative, a friend suggested to use the word 보조하다 in this context, so something like 벤치프레스 보조 좀 해 주시겠어요?


2

In addition to other good answers, I'll point out that the distinction of 선배/후배 does not necessarily equal social status (and who gets to say 반말 to who). For example, let's say 철수 starts his career at a factory and later decides to enter college. Being a freshman, he is introduced to 재인, a sophomore, who is four years younger than 철수. In this situation, ...


2

Yes, the "proper" table manner is to use the spoon and chopsticks separately. However, when people eat ramen, they don't usually care about table manners, just like people don't look for forks and knives in McDonalds. I think people generally don't mind table manners that much, unless you're meeting, say, your father-in-law. After all, whether someone ...


2

Interesting inquiry. Generally, in Korea, there does not exist a differentiation between meat based solely on its appearance i.e. color an or texture. Rather, each separate sections of meat can be identified specifically by name. Nonetheless, there still exists terms such as 붉은 살코기, 흰 살코기 which in fact are primarily used in both heath and medical fields. ...


2

I always considered it an 'English distortion effect' when trying to nail down the sound from Korean to English as close as possible. Words in English that don't have any consonants look weird (이 -> Ee?), while Yi or Lee provide a very similar sound, but distort it a bit to make the word more readable.


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