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10 votes
Accepted

How can I ask someone to repeat a statement in Korean?

"네?" is a semi-formal and probably the simplest way. If you talk to friends, you can simply say "응?". If you talk to someone really close to you, you can also say "뭐?"
JSong's user avatar
  • 1,668
9 votes
Accepted

How should I use the pronoun 당신?

In general, "당신" is a honorific expression indicating the listener, but the listener may be not close to the speaker. 당신의 이름이 무엇인지 알고 싶습니다. 당신을 기억하고 있겠습니다. However, "당신" can be a ...
choco_addicted's user avatar
9 votes
Accepted

What is a polite term of address to use for a friend's mother?

In order to address my own mother, I would use the word "어머니." In order to address someone else's mother, I would use the word "어머님." It comes down to honorific usage; please refer to the section ...
Phonics The Hedgehog's user avatar
7 votes
Accepted

Addressing someone on the street you have never met and who is of ambiguous age

For strangers being approached in real life, 반말 is never an option. 존댓말 is obligatory, and is mostly 해요체 - informal (as this isn't a business meeting) but polite. However, whether you need ...
Michaelyus's user avatar
  • 2,463
6 votes
Accepted

When to use -세요 and when -(으)ㅂ니다?

You're mixing two slightly different aspects of speech. One (합쇼체: ~습니다/ㅂ니다) is more of a level of formality due to setting and the other(시) is a level of respect towards the subject of your sentences. ...
blimpy's user avatar
  • 999
5 votes

What's the honorific to represent a female's older sister?

There seems to be no honorific expression of 언니. {언니}는 여성끼리의 호칭어다. 앞서 확인한 다른 호칭어와 같이 친족 집단에서 사용되며 비 친족 집단에서 [친밀]의 공유를 중심으로 사용되는 공통점을 가진다. 하지만 다른 어휘소가 {형님}, {오라버니}, {누님}같은 확장 어휘소를 가지는 것과 달리 {언니}는 ...
choco_addicted's user avatar
5 votes
Accepted

Do we use honorifics when talking about seniors in the third person?

There are 2 ways of expressing the honorific in Korean (3 actually, but one is limited to a few cases). Listener honorific (상대경어법): used to give respect to the person / people you're speaking to. ...
gaeguri's user avatar
  • 6,004
5 votes

How can I ask someone to repeat a statement in Korean?

My Korean teachers always made me say: 다시 한번 해 주세요? (Please say that again one more time?)
klementine's user avatar
4 votes

How can I ask someone to repeat a statement in Korean?

You don't necessarily need to ask directly. For example: (죄송합니다,) (잘) 못 들었어요. ((Sorry,) I didn't hear what you said.) There is no explicit request, but they will understand that you want to listen ...
choco_addicted's user avatar
3 votes

교수님 성함께서는 vs 교수님 성함은

When you say 우리 교수님 성함, you're omitting the possessive particle 의. (Which is totally fine, by the way.) Therefore, the topic particle should follow the actual subject - 성함 - not its possessive entity. ...
spicypumpkin's user avatar
3 votes

What's the meaning and appropriate usage of 잘 부탁드립니다?

It is spoken in reference to any relationship expected to last for some time, in which you, the speaker, will be dependent (however tenuously) on the kind disposition of the other, i.e. the addressee. ...
Catomic's user avatar
  • 1,337
3 votes
Accepted

Is there a difference between -뜹니다 and -씁니다?

i'm a korean. -뜹니다. is not formal expression. If someone want to show cuteness, the word goes like that. like 'ㅃ', 'ㄸ', 'ㅉ' pronunciation, These consonant sound 'cute' to korean. So they use these ...
Chan-ho Lee's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

If you accidentally use an inappropriate level of politeness, what is the best way to 'recover'?

It would be unacceptable from a native Korean speaker, but from a foreigner, they'll understand. Honorifics are hard, and they know it's hard to learn. In my opinion, you should just correct it right ...
user3932000's user avatar
3 votes

What is a polite term of address to use for a friend's mother?

아주머니 is the best word for this. 아줌마 is informal and sounds a little immature.
MujjinGun's user avatar
  • 7,527
2 votes
Accepted

Can 어떻게 돼요 be seen the polite way to say 뭐예요 ('what is it')?

As a general rule, just like in English, people think it's more polite if you can say the same sentence using more (meaningless) words. For example, you can ask a person's name by Could you tell me ...
krim's user avatar
  • 1,149
2 votes

If you accidentally use an inappropriate level of politeness, what is the best way to 'recover'?

As a beginner and recently traved to Korea for an extended stay in order to get first hand experience, I can tell you most Koreans will not be offended if you overall, respect them with your choice of ...
완벽한 씨's user avatar
2 votes

If you accidentally use an inappropriate level of politeness, what is the best way to 'recover'?

"몇 살이에요?" is not as offensive as "어디가?" "밥 만들어줄까?" As others pointed out, you can get away with your mistakes because you are a foreigner. If you were a Korean, you would be fired because it's simply ...
Tracy McMillian's user avatar
2 votes

Addressing someone on the street you have never met and who is of ambiguous age

The problem is difficult for me, too. I add more on Michaelyus's answer (When I was twenties, I use 저기요 but nowadays I use avoiding personal pronouns) As I observe Koreans (who knows Korean culture ...
HK Lee's user avatar
  • 3,051
2 votes

Addressing someone on the street you have never met and who is of ambiguous age

Interrupt a stranger for the purpose of further communication by saying: 실례합니다 (shee-lay hamneeda) A frequently heard substitution to this is: 죄송합니다 (chay-sohng hamneeda) However, according to ...
제이 죤스톤's user avatar
2 votes

Is it grammatically correct to add 요 to everything?

No, you can't add it to everything. For example you can't add it certain (for lack of a better word) 'standard' endings such as (스)ㅂ니다, (십)시오, (으)ㅂ시다, (어/아/여)라, (는)구나, 게, (이)오, and a few things like ...
B. Alvn's user avatar
  • 1,237
2 votes

What does this North Korean woman mean by joking about "ear wax" when they are about to eat?

Welcome! The food you are referring to seems to be 편육, which really is a ham made from pig's head. It is quite popular in South Korea, and from the video I presume that it also is in the North as ...
Jihyung Kang's user avatar
2 votes

Is 옥체 used to refer to people's body?

There's a fine line between "polite" and "too polite." In modern Korean, terms like 옥체 is pretty much confined to historical dramas, as Korea no longer has a king. I'd argue that ...
jick's user avatar
  • 7,402

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