11

I think the dialect tag is a good one to put here as it basically summarizes the idea of the differences here: enough to be like two separate dialects (simplifying, Korean has 9 dialects). To my understanding Korean spoken in the North has aimed to be 'pure' in a sense - that is refraining from having loan words from the Japanese language (English too, ...


9

The North Korean government uses not only poetic words, but they also pronounce everything in a very sentimental and "epic" way. It sounds funny to South Koreans, because not even the most formal levels of speech in the South sound any closer to it. You can watch videos of North Korean TV on Youtube to see how much effort they put into sounding like ...


9

This seems true in North Korean media, though I can't say what's taught in their schools. As I understand, 한자 (Hanja) was no longer in use in 북한 (DPRK, aka North Korea) by the end of the Korean War, and upheld this way as the regime wants to maintain a monolithic culture among its people. To substantiate this somewhat, it is even strongly frowned upon (if ...


7

There are some words borrowed from Russian in North Korean, but not nearly as many as there are words from English in South Korean. The North Korean government has really emphasized their independence, and made efforts to rid their language of "impure elements". So they have sometimes created replacement words for foreign-borrowed words. So overall, ...


7

North Korea and Russia are strategically close countries, but because North Korea uses the same language as Korea, linguistically it is not helpful to learn Russia 북한과 러시아는 친하지만, 북한과 한국만 같은 언어를 사용하기 때문에, 러시아를 배운다 해도 북한 언어를 배우는 데 아무런 도움이 되지 않는다.


6

As I know, the -게 되다 ending changes the verb into passive. Not always, at least not in the English grammar sense of a passive verb form being one that shows that its grammatical subject is the "recipient" of an action, rather than the "doer" of an action - e.g. to kick is active, while to be kicked is passive. X-게 되다 doesn't necessarily mean that something ...


5

Adding a consonant to a sentence-ending predicate often changes overall air of the sentence. A stop sound would make an imperative perfectly restrained and well regulated, I think. As a result, you would find ㅅ-appended imperatives often in military contexts, but not in every day conversations. (And, of course, in the north, given its militant, revolutionary ...


4

-네 is often used for poetic expression, but it is also used to express your confirmation of your feelings or the fact. For example, '오늘 날씨가 좋네.' -리라,아라/어라/여라, 리 are same and are used in South Korea too. You could see them in the North Korea's patriotic songs easily because they're used in the situation to express your wishes. -마 is little different than ...


4

The part she's having trouble reading isn't the clear hangeul letter (which reads "이딸리아 특산물 식당" or 이딸리아 축산물 식당" - it's a bit too unclear to read); it's this stylized logo: This logo does have hangeul as well, 륭성 I think; but as it's a stylized neon sign, it is quite difficult to read.


3

근위 (noun) : protecting something in close distance 근위 is not used in South Korea nowdays. 근위 is protecting something in close distance. At a monarchial system, 근위병 is a soldier protecting a king so that they are in more honorable position than normal soldiers. So North Korean gave to 류경수's army the word "근위" as a honorable title for blessing their fight at ...


3

그이 is meaning “that person” and 장군복? is (army) general's uniform 대를이어 : by generation 또 한분의: Another person or another one


3

Can't tell about North Korean, but "-는 데서" is commonly used in South Korea. You might have missed it because in South Korea it is written with a space: 데 is a noun (의존 명사) meaning "place" or "thing(?)". 서 is just short for "-에서". And you are right, they are completely different from verb suffix "-는데". Here ...


3

The 아/어/여 주다 Pattern means that you are doing something for the benefit of someone. Think of cases where you would say ".... for me" or " for someone" in English. 말씀하시였다 - you said/told something. 말씀하시였다 - you said/told something for someone's benefit. (Perhaps you told them some useful information that they are grateful for.). Note that if the ...


3

I agree with user919. The distinct, grandiose wording and delivery is common with North Korean state media, but no one in the South speaks like that, even in the most formal of settings. (I have only ever heard that style of speaking in South Korea when used to mock the North Korean state media.) Example of said North Korean delivery style, (daily news ...


3

In short, monosyllabic given names are still used, and they mostly mean not much more than their parents' preference. These names are old and this format is not used nowadays. No, they are not. Monosyllabic given names are less popular than disyllabic given names, but they are still considered normal and are still used. Modern (born after 1945) examples ...


2

The knowledge of Russian will not help. 문화어 doesn't use Russian words widely, although you can find some of them in the news or everyday speech (뜨락또르 for tractor, 꼴바사, rarely, for sausage, 욜까 for Christmas tree). By the way, many Russian words that were being used in 1950-70-s, aren't used today. The vast majority of loanwords in North-Korean is also ...


2

First of all, according to this post on Naver knowledge search, 재부 is, as you guessed, a North Korean version of "재산". So it can mean property, assets, riches, etc. The phrase "최대의 ~" can mean "The greatest ~" - so here, "the greatest asset" or "the greatest riches". So the above phrase could be "Knowledge is the greatest asset of creation and building",...


2

As a born and raised in South Korea. The difference between South and North are.. (imo) accent like British English and American English North Korea use try not to use words from other countries. They translate to a pure Korean word but it sounds weird. Each country use own dictionary. A long time ago in 1980ish, they try to make one unify dictionary (http:/...


2

동사 + 보조동사 (verb + helping verb) : For instance, 봐 주다 (봐=see, 주다=give, meaning=give an irregular benefit), 도와 주다 (help=give a help) 보조 동사의 효과 (effect) : 맡다 = undertake Handle the enemy of east (order => intimate expression => honorific expression) : (동쪽의 적은 니가) 맡어, 맡아라, 맡을래? => 말아 줄래 ? => 맡으세요. 맡아 주세요. He handled the enemy of east (동쪽의 적은 그가) 맡았다 => 맡아 ...


2

It is a traffic sign plate. 섯 means that after stopping, if there is no dangerous thing, then you would go. In south Korea, 정지 STOP is written in a road sign plate. North Korea does not use China character and English as possible as they can. So many words are similar to south but different. For instance, 냉면 (south word) is 찬국수 (cf. cold noodle). That is, ...


2

They have a different accent, but their pronunciations of those vowels are basically same. One notable thing is, a boundary of ㅐ and ㅔ has been blurred in both ROK and DPRK.


2

론 is only used in north korea it's like north's accent. 로운 is the correct word in South Korean.


2

Normally you can attach -시- to any verb where the subject is "honored", but if a sentence has too many verbs it may become a bit cumbersome. I'm no expert on North Korean, but I guess a phrase like "위대한 장군님" is basically a set phrase and used as a single unit all the time, so people have stopped worrying about whether that is "polite" enough. Just like ...


2

Verb + 아/어/여 나가다 is sometimes used to form a compound verb with another verb, often in the context of a decisive action going forward. Some examples: 앞길을 열어 나가자!: Let's open/clear the path (from here on)! 맹세를 변함없이 지켜나가도록 해 야 합니다: We must (decisively) keep this oath (from here on). The form Verb + 아/어/여 나가다 can also just be used in simple compound to form ...


2

북한어 north-korean chose a vowel "l" than "ㅏ", compared to 남한어 south-korean, sometimes. 북한어 (남한어) : 그러니끼 (그러니까 thus), 수집다(수줍다 be shy), 부시다(부수다 break), 내놓이다(내놓아 지다 be shown), 엮이다(엮어 지다 be involved) Long ago, gag man followed north-korean speaking for a satire or joy. In my thought, it is an easy technic. For instance, 내레 그러니끼 ... 그렇습니끼 ? (I thus ... is it ...


2

Let's look at the case when the target (object receiver) is not the speaker. This figure that I draw will help you understand the difference, although it is inapplicable to some types of sentences such as imperative sentences. The terms in the figure are just what I use. Here are notes on the figure: The object can be either a thing or a person (선물, which ...


2

Welcome! The food you are referring to seems to be 편육, which really is a ham made from pig's head. It is quite popular in South Korea, and from the video I presume that it also is in the North as well ;) That being said, talking about ear wax at dinner table wouldn't be appropriate in Korea, just like any other western society. A Korean kid talking aloud ...


1

I'm a south Korean. '~에요' is most used in South Korea. 아요, 어요, 여요 are rarely used in South korea. ~습니다 is used widely in South Korea too. 오/소 is rarely used in South Korea, maybe old people or some province (my mother sometimes say '~소') but young people do not use ~오/~소(가오/갔소). But I think DPRK use that forms a lot. If Someone say ~소 a lot, maybe most ...


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