11 votes

What, if any, are the primary differences between Korean as spoken in the North and that spoken in the South?

I think the dialect tag is a good one to put here as it basically summarizes the idea of the differences here: enough to be like two separate dialects (simplifying, Korean has 9 dialects). To my ...
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  • 833
9 votes
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DPRK proclamations are written in English using very nuanced (flowery) adjectives. Is this a regular part of Korean speech?

The North Korean government uses not only poetic words, but they also pronounce everything in a very sentimental and "epic" way. It sounds funny to South Koreans, because not even the most formal ...
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  • 108
9 votes
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Is hanja opposed in North Korea?

This seems true in North Korean media, though I can't say what's taught in their schools. As I understand, 한자 (Hanja) was no longer in use in 북한 (DPRK, aka North Korea) by the end of the Korean War, ...
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7 votes
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How helpful is knowing Russian vocabulary for knowing vocabulary which only occurs in North Korean?

There are some words borrowed from Russian in North Korean, but not nearly as many as there are words from English in South Korean. The North Korean government has really emphasized their ...
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  • 5,904
7 votes

How helpful is knowing Russian vocabulary for knowing vocabulary which only occurs in North Korean?

North Korea and Russia are strategically close countries, but because North Korea uses the same language as Korea, linguistically it is not helpful to learn Russia 북한과 러시아는 친하지만, 북한과 한국만 같은 언어를 사용하기 ...
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6 votes
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Passive voice with -게 되다

As I know, the -게 되다 ending changes the verb into passive. Not always, at least not in the English grammar sense of a passive verb form being one that shows that its grammatical subject is the "...
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5 votes
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Imperative forms ending in -ᄉ/것

Adding a consonant to a sentence-ending predicate often changes overall air of the sentence. A stop sound would make an imperative perfectly restrained and well regulated, I think. As a result, you ...
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  • 1,058
5 votes
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Does North Korean have a minimal pair with palatalization of ㅈ/ㅉ/ㅊ amongst Sino-Korean words?

문화어 is largely based on the early 20th-century central dialect of Korean. The distinction between 차 and 챠 (처 and 쳐, 쵸 and 초, 자 and 쟈, etc) were already long gone in the central dialect (which includes ...
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  • 7,302
4 votes
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Verb endings usage in DPRK

-네 is often used for poetic expression, but it is also used to express your confirmation of your feelings or the fact. For example, '오늘 날씨가 좋네.' -리라,아라/어라/여라, 리 are same and are used in South Korea ...
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  • 56
4 votes

Why does the North Korean guide in this video not seem to understand written Korean letters?

The part she's having trouble reading isn't the clear hangeul letter (which reads "이딸리아 특산물 식당" or 이딸리아 축산물 식당" - it's a bit too unclear to read); it's this stylized logo: This logo does have hangeul ...
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  • 5,904
3 votes
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Meaning of 근위 서울 류경수 제105땅크사단

근위 (noun) : protecting something in close distance 근위 is not used in South Korea nowdays. 근위 is protecting something in close distance. At a monarchial system, 근위병 is a soldier protecting a king so ...
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  • 3,013
3 votes
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Please translate some North related words

그이 is meaning “that person” and 장군복? is (army) general's uniform 대를이어 : by generation 또 한분의: Another person or another one
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3 votes
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-는데서 verb ending in 문화어

Can't tell about North Korean, but "-는 데서" is commonly used in South Korea. You might have missed it because in South Korea it is written with a space: 데 is a noun (의존 명사) meaning "...
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  • 7,024
3 votes

DPRK proclamations are written in English using very nuanced (flowery) adjectives. Is this a regular part of Korean speech?

I agree with user919. The distinct, grandiose wording and delivery is common with North Korean state media, but no one in the South speaks like that, even in the most formal of settings. (I have ...
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  • 51
3 votes
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Korean one-syllable given names

In short, monosyllabic given names are still used, and they mostly mean not much more than their parents' preference. These names are old and this format is not used nowadays. No, they are not. ...
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  • 1,367
2 votes

How helpful is knowing Russian vocabulary for knowing vocabulary which only occurs in North Korean?

The knowledge of Russian will not help. 문화어 doesn't use Russian words widely, although you can find some of them in the news or everyday speech (뜨락또르 for tractor, 꼴바사, rarely, for sausage, 욜까 for ...
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  • 1,220
2 votes

Translation of North Korean poster :"지식은 창조와 건설의 최대의 재부!"

First of all, according to this post on Naver knowledge search, 재부 is, as you guessed, a North Korean version of "재산". So it can mean property, assets, riches, etc. The phrase "최대의 ~" can mean "...
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  • 5,904
2 votes

What, if any, are the primary differences between Korean as spoken in the North and that spoken in the South?

As a born and raised in South Korea. The difference between South and North are.. (imo) accent like British English and American English North Korea use try not to use words from other countries. ...
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  • 585
2 votes
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Pronunciation differences between 어 and 오, 애 and 에 in DPRK

They have a different accent, but their pronunciations of those vowels are basically same. One notable thing is, a boundary of ㅐ and ㅔ has been blurred in both ROK and DPRK.
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  • 81
2 votes

About adding -주 to the verb stem

동사 + 보조동사 (verb + helping verb) : For instance, 봐 주다 (봐=see, 주다=give, meaning=give an irregular benefit), 도와 주다 (help=give a help) 보조 동사의 효과 (effect) : 맡다 = undertake Handle the enemy of east (order ...
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  • 3,013
2 votes
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About adding -주 to the verb stem

The 아/어/여 주다 Pattern means that you are doing something for the benefit of someone. Think of cases where you would say ".... for me" or " for someone" in English. 말씀하시였다 - you said/told something. ...
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2 votes

Imperative forms ending in -ᄉ/것

It is a traffic sign plate. 섯 means that after stopping, if there is no dangerous thing, then you would go. In south Korea, 정지 STOP is written in a road sign plate. North Korea does not use China ...
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  • 3,013
2 votes
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Adjective endings 론 and 로운

론 is only used in north korea it's like north's accent. 로운 is the correct word in South Korean.
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  • 457
2 votes
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위대한 수령 without honorific 시

Normally you can attach -시- to any verb where the subject is "honored", but if a sentence has too many verbs it may become a bit cumbersome. I'm no expert on North Korean, but I guess a phrase like "...
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  • 7,024
2 votes
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Construction of Verb + 나가다

Verb + 아/어/여 나가다 is sometimes used to form a compound verb with another verb, often in the context of a decisive action going forward. Some examples: 앞길을 열어 나가자!: Let's open/clear the path (from here ...
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  • 3,884
2 votes
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The meaning of -보있다

북한어 north-korean chose a vowel "l" than "ㅏ", compared to 남한어 south-korean, sometimes. 북한어 (남한어) : 그러니끼 (그러니까 thus), 수집다(수줍다 be shy), 부시다(부수다 break), 내놓이다(내놓아 지다 be shown), 엮이다(엮어 지다 be involved) ...
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  • 3,013
2 votes
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What's the difference between 보내다 and 보내여오다?

Let's look at the case when the target (object receiver) is not the speaker. This figure that I draw will help you understand the difference, although it is inapplicable to some types of sentences ...
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  • 3,238
2 votes

What does this North Korean woman mean by joking about "ear wax" when they are about to eat?

Welcome! The food you are referring to seems to be 편육, which really is a ham made from pig's head. It is quite popular in South Korea, and from the video I presume that it also is in the North as ...
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