20

Generic "you" or "one" in English is just a filler word for a subject. In Korean you don't need to use it, since you can just drop the subject. when one is hungry, everything tastes good 배고플 때면 뭐든지 맛있게 느껴진다. Notice there isn't a subject in the sentence. when you are a young teacher, you have a lot of work These kind of sentences just ...


11

Koreaboo means people who are great fans of Korean pop culture, almost maniacal. But unlike 'K-pop fan', Koreaboo has a little bit of a disparaging nuance. In Korean, 팬 just means a fan. When degrading crazy fans, (e.g. 14-year-old Justin Bieber fans) -빠 is used. 축(구)빠 means football(축구) fan, 야(구)빠 means baseball(야구) fan and 엑소빠 means fans of Exo, a K-pop ...


11

If you search for "ant" in a small English dictionary, you will only find about the insect. But "Antarctica" is not ant's Arctic, it's "anti-Arctica", i.e., something that's the opposite side of the Arctic. In fact "ant(i)-" is a very common English prefix, even though it's normally not used as an word by itself. ...


8

Okay, firstly, you can't say you. Should you have to say you, you can't use 너. That's pretty rude. So, then, just leave the you out and let's go on. There are few variants I recommend. 제가 할게요 or 제가 하겠습니다 - I will do it. The other one is more of the "favor" feel. 제가 해 드릴까요? - Shall I do it for you? Or you could force the issue. 제가 해 드리겠습니다 - I'...


8

The verb is 퍼뜨리다, although it is sometimes pronounced [퍼트리다] by some speakers. It means to spread. EDIT Actually, 퍼트리다 is also an alternative standard form of the verb. This generally applies to most verbs ending with -뜨리다, that you can also say -트리다.


7

Word initial it is unvoiced, hence [k]. In medial positions, it becomes voiced, hence [g]. This is a regular phonological process, so native speakers without linguistic training are typically unaware of the difference. Also note that is a regular pattern found in many other Korean consonants. How you wish to romanize it depends on the romanization scheme. ...


7

떽떽이를 위한 노래 떽떽거리다 means speak loudly with stuck-upness ~이 means a person. I think it's the same ~er in English. So 떽떽이 means someone who speaks loudly with stuck-upness. But here, I think Vladhagen's explanation about 떽떽이 is more proper. We need to listen to the song for more exact meaning. 위한 means for. 노래 means song. So 떽떽이를 위한 노래 means Song for 떽떽이. ...


7

-기 위해(서) here means "to"/"in order to". When you attach -기 위해(서) to verbs, it becomes "to + verb". For example : 채소를 사기 위해(서) 시장에 갔다. (I went to the market to buy vegetables). 책을 빌리기 위해(서) 도서관에 갈 것이다. (I'm going to go to the library to borrow a book). You can also attach 위해(서) to nouns as well. When you do this, you don't need to add -기. You add 을/...


6

The correct spelling is 지금부터 갈 데까지 가 볼까? -까 is mostly some kind of deliberation or suggestion. The example roughly translates to, "Shall we try and go all the way from now on?" or "Do you want to try going all the way from now on?" A note: strictly translating -보다 to "try" can often be a bit too much, it's just a way to make a suggestion sound more gentle....


6

I'm Korean and I am not good at English! Sorry for that. 이것은 재미있는 작은 오락거리다. 저는 인터넷은 일하러 사용하지 않는데, 그것은 그냥 재미있는 작은 오락거리예요. Yes, both sentences sound natural to me. It's little awkward, but there is nothing wrong. Maybe you could try: 저는 인터넷을 일할 때 사용하진 않아요. 주로 놀 때 사용하죠. It is proper since we usually explain '오락거리' itself rather than explaining the usage of ...


6

Simply put the object with objective particle. X를 복제할 수 있어요? Or you can use sort-of passive form by placing X at the subject, depending on the focus of the question. X가 복제되요? In this case, you are asking the possibility of X being cloned, while the first asking about the listener's capability of cloning X.


6

The best I can come up with for the song is "Song for the Loud Mouth." The "loud mouth" here is not a literal translation. I have tried to work the phrase "떽떽이" into meaningful English here. "떽떽이" is an idiom of sorts. I have heard it used on the context of a "loud mouth" or a person who cannot stop running their mouth. The album title is also a bit hard ...


6

고수 : expert 중수(joong soo) : intermediate 하수(ha soo) : beginner However, in the same way, 초보(chobo) is typically more used as Ha Soo 고/중/하 mean high/mid/low. 수 means a hand which could mean a level in some case. These words are very old but still popular in Go, martial art or video games.


6

청소기는 너무 세게 틀면 안된다. 먼지가 더 안 들어온다. "If you use vacuum with too much power, it can't suck dust as much" I don't think it makes much sense, but apparently mom thinks that she needs to set the vacuum power level to medium instead of the highest..


6

Translation, and about why it can be so rude. First of all, as the context implies, this expression should not even be used unless the "listener" felt he/she is very close to the speaker (not vice versa). How one lives his/her life should not be another person's matter as much as to justify the '~마' ending ( vs '~마세요') Even if the sentence is rewritten ...


6

'다음 주' and '그 다음 주' are little different. You may understand when seeing the examples. For example, you ask to the doctor for reserving your next visit, and the doctor says, 다음 주에요. Visit next week. 3월 첫째주에 와도 될까요? 제가 다음 주에는 바빠서요. Oh, can I come the first week of March? I'm busy next week. 그러면 그 다음 주에 오세요. Then, please come the next week (of the first ...


5

Unless there were any reason to assume a number other than one, just saying 봉투 주세요 would be fine. 봉투 하나 주세요 is also fine, and removes any doubt that only one is needed. 봉투 한 장 주세요 is the most 'proper', but even in Korean, sometimes most proper isn't the most common or appropriate - it could sound like you are over-egging the pudding. When a number is needed,...


5

손뼉도 마주쳐야 소리가 난다 one hand can't clap alone I'd say it's pretty common, no native won't recognize it.


5

The correct spelling is 멀리 떠나버린 못 잊을 님이여. 멀리 – far 떠나버린 – (who) has left (past adjective form of 떠나버리다. 떠나다 means "leave" and the -버리다 ending intensifies the feeling.) 못 – cannot 잊을 – (who) will forget (future adjective form of 잊다) 님 – honorific word for an esteemed person. Hard to translate on its own. "beloved person", as you said would fit. -이여 – Archaic ...


5

I found following information on google. (you can find more on google) http://bizkorea.org/company/view.asp?SEQ=665962 it seems that '희창기계' is a very small korean company located in Daegu and T.354-1904 is surely their telephone number. in korea, very small local companies usually ommit area codes in their telephone number, as they really don't need to ...


5

"몇 살 먹었다" 라는 표현은 친구들[하고만or한테만] 사용할 수 있어? 아니면 좀 전에 만나서 잘 모르는 사람[에게or한테] 이 말 사용해도 돼? *"몇 살 먹었다" is not 질문. You can ask someone's age like 몇 살이세요? 연세가 어떻게 되세요? "연세" is honorifics of "나이". So 2. is more polite expression. Both are already honorifics so you can use for everyone.


5

가슴 is breast or chest. 마음 is attitude, thinking or feeling. Sometimes 가슴 can be used to mean 마음 but 마음 cannot substitute 가슴. I will give you examples to help your understanding. 내 여자친구는 가슴이 커. (My girlfriends has big breasts.) 내 여자친구는 마음이 커. (This usage is incorrect.) 어제 여자친구랑 헤어졌어. 그래서 마음이 아파. (I broke up my girlfriend with yesterday, so I'm ...


5

기억 has a more general meaning, and is used to mean just the fact that you remember something. If you're talking about cognitive memory, you will use 기억. It can be used for remembering facts, events, etc. You can also use it for the ability to remember, though then 기억력 is better. It can also be made into a verb, 기억하다, to remember. 추억 cannot be made into a ...


5

Before starting my answer, I would like to mention I don't have a professional knowledge in Korean, but I would like to share what I think as a native speaker. For the first question, whether ~스럽다 means worthy of ~, I will not say it is totally wrong, but I do not agree. I would like say the meaning of '~스럽다' is more closer to 'be (like) ~', or ' as like ~'. ...


5

See 더러 in Naver dictionary: (사람을 나타내는 체언 뒤에 붙어) 어떤 행동이 미치는 대상을 나타내는 격 조사. As far as I can remember it's only used for verbs like 시키다, 묻다, or 부탁하다, that is, where a person is speaking to another. In most cases, I think it can be replaced by 에게 without change of meaning. So the sentence means: [It] can be as difficult as telling an egg to become a ...


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