20

Generic "you" or "one" in English is just a filler word for a subject. In Korean you don't need to use it, since you can just drop the subject. when one is hungry, everything tastes good 배고플 때면 뭐든지 맛있게 느껴진다. Notice there isn't a subject in the sentence. when you are a young teacher, you have a lot of work These kind of sentences just ...


6

The 국립국어원학습사전 has more complete definitions for 가다듬다: brace; pull oneself together 마음이나 정신 등을 바로잡다. To collect one's mind, spirit, etc. together. adjust oneself 몸가짐이나 자세 등을 단정하게 정리하다. To straighten one's conduct, posture, etc. clear; adjust 목청이나 호흡 등을 고르게 조절하다. To clear one's throat or adjust one's breath. set in good order 흐트러진 대열이나 조직 등을 정리하여 싸울 준비를 하다. ...


5

You call it the order of precedence. Quoting Wikipedia, Order of precedence is a sequential hierarchy of nominal importance of persons. Most often it is used in the context of people by many organizations and governments, for very formal and state occasions, especially where diplomats are present.


4

If I write two words you have given, jin-hee is 진희 or less likely 진히 jin-hae is 진해 First of all, 진희 a common last name especially for girls. I can't think of other use cases of 진희 other than a person's name. 진해 can be an adjective of 진하다 meaning dark, thick, deep, or strong. It can also be a name of an administrative district in souther Korea: 진해구 Jinhae-...


4

I think the word you're looking for is '김여사' which translates into 'Madame Kim'. It's a derogatory term for bad female driver. Kim is the most common last name in Korea and '여사' is a formal title often used for someone with higher education or wealth. Basically, stereotyping upper class people who have chauffeurs, or who get their driver's license via ...


3

I think that "사고력(思考力)" can be a candidate. To be more precise, "논리적(論理的)" can be added. 이 과목은 아이들에게 창조적이고 종합적인 사고력을 키워 주는 것이 그 목적이다. 여옥은 학교 시절 무척 총명했으며 명희보다 적극적이었고 사고력도 명쾌했다.


3

For anyone that that is doing translation and needs something to freshen up the "one" that means "everyone", one might use 남녀노소 A "four character idiom" (사자성어), this literally translates to: Men, women, old, and young So "when hungry, no matter who you are, everything tastes good": 남녀노소 배고플 때면 뭐든지 맛있게 느껴진다


3

"Let's" in Korean is expressed by two endings: Adding 자 after verb stem. Example: 같이 가자! Adding ㅂ/읍시다 after verb stem, which is a bit more respectful than the first one. Example: 그 거 봅시다. This one is respectful enough between friends, or your inferior, but never to a one deserving high respect. However, this one is a bit formal, and is nit recommended ...


3

Arguably the Korean wikipedia page isn't great, but it says: 관련된 한국어 단어로는 “쌤통”과 “고소하다”가 있다. "쌤통" is roughly the same as schadenfreude, although this word is quite informal. You would use it as: 쌤통이다. 그것 참 쌤통이다. The second sentence would mean roughly "He deserved it." or "I'm glad that it happened to him!" "고소하다" ...


3

I'll get skinned alive if the teacher catches me playing games in class is an imagery that English speakers say idiomatically but don't really envision the true imagery of when speaking. The idiomatic phrase that would feel the same would be to simply say Get caught playing games in class, and (he'll) kill you! 교실에서 게임하다 걸리면 넌 죽을 거다!


3

The cheer you've described is called 선창(先唱) -- literally a "leading call." 진에어 하나 둘 셋! 진에어 화이팅! Quick googling gives me two kinds of usage. Properly speaking, only the first line ("진에어 하나 둘 셋!") should be called the 선창 and the latter ("진에어 화이팅!") the 후창(後唱), the "following call." But colloquially, both lines altogether could be called 선창 or 선창 응원 by ...


3

호감 would be a good choice for your example. Although I have found 애착 is used in a dictionary, I think 애착 is more of obsession or attachment. "We seem to like each other a lot, but he didn't show me any affection." That may be translated as "저도 걔를 무척 좋아하고 걔도 저를 많이 좋아하는 것 같은데 걔는 제게 호감을 (전혀) 표현하지 않았어요." Edit: Technically, 호감 (a good feeling towards ...


3

people sharing the myth, or people who believe the myth, etc. would be proper, I think.


2

Best way to express if two lovers are affectionate, you’d say 애정어린. 애정어린 말투 -> spoken with affection 애정어린 눈빛 -> Affectionate look 호감 wouldn’t be a good fit because it means interest. If you just met someone you would use 호감 to express interest. You wouldn’t use 호감 between two lovers.


2

고: 고유 명사 (proper noun), when the noun is a specific location or person. 보: 보조 동사(auxiliary verb), to be added after another verb/adjective to adjust the meaning. Ex: 이기다 => 이겨내다 의: 의존 명사(dependent noun), namely nouns that must follow a specified grammatical pattern. I can't find any info. on 불. If you tell me which dictionary you saw this, it will be ...


1

If you are looking for a specific, regular, academic term in English that will sound natural for researchers from the English world, I think you should better ask the question in English Language & Usage Stack Exchange, by explaining the context and meaning in English. That said, there are a couple of terms used in the Korean academia. The following ...


1

I guess 부자연스럽다 is one word that has the same meaning. You can say this Korean expression is 부자연스럽다. From naver online dictionary: Search 부자연스럽다 부자연스럽다


1

The word '작위적' may be suitable for the situation. It means '꾸며서 하는 것이 두드러지게 눈에 띄는. 또는 그런 것.' according to Korean standard grand dictionary; http://stdweb2.korean.go.kr/main.jsp


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible