8 votes
Accepted

How to make passives with the 에게 form

I think there is a lexical sensitivity to the choice between 에게 and the more formal and universal 에 의하여 (for 'by'). That is to say, most any active form can go into the passive and take 에 의하여. Your ...
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  • 1,287
5 votes
Accepted

Why do we even need subject particles (이/가)?

Would any ambiguity or conflict with existing grammatical rules arise? I know particles are often dropped in colloquial speech, but are nouns ever used without any case markers in proper grammatical ...
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  • 7,372
4 votes
Accepted

Why would you ever use -에서?

에서 is not made of 에+서: on the contrary, 서 is considered a shortened form of more common 에서. When describing places (i.e., where it happens), different verbs take either 에 or 에서. As HK Lee said, -에 ...
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  • 7,054
1 vote
Accepted

What is the difference between 과의 and just 과?

I am not 100% sure on the logic for this usage, but I will add my ideas about it. A phrase including 와의/과의 ("●●와의/과의 ◆◆") requires that these two nouns come before and after 와의/과의, ...
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  • 3,228
1 vote
Accepted

When to add 속 to mean "in the ~"?

In addition to Usin Jung's answer, the difference is that 집(house) can be considered a place, but 풀(grass) is not. Hence you can say "집에서 놀아요" or "집에 도착했어요", but you can't say "풀에서 놀아요" or "풀에 도착했어요."...
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  • 7,054
1 vote

When to add 속 to mean "in the ~"?

"집 안" is more appropriate than "집 속". Everything else is fine. "속" contains the edges of the interior, while "안" represents the center of the interior. For another example, "물 속" is less awkward than "...
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  • 171
1 vote

Why would you ever use -에서?

Usually 에 means 'state' : The money is in my pocket. 그 돈은 내 지갑에 있다. And 에서 means 'activity' : I used to eat a meal at home. 나는 집에서 밥을 먹곤 했다. I live in Seoul city. 나는 서울에서 살고 있다. Lastly, 에서는 means '...
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  • 3,013

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