hello I am beginner in korean language and I read a book about hangul and grammatic but I do not read book about history or school and I am learning korean language with K-POP and Dramas, should I learn korean language with book school or with music and dramas could I get a fluencly in korean well not native yet but could I well spoken with other people korean may be slower but we could understand us

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    Hi Simon - I'm not quite sure what you mean by "should I learn Korean language with book school" - do you mean using a textbook ? You said you read a grammar book already - which one did you read? – topo morto Nov 25 at 19:43
  • I want to say book from the school , textbook for learning a language for example in my case it was a book for learning spanish when I was younger – Gilberto Quintero A Nov 29 at 1:09

Yes. I think so : I believe that we can not learn foreign language through TV dramas or songs. They can be a useful catalyser, but In my thought, we need at least one grammar book.

You should study korean through the books like Korea Learning book, It teach basic lessom from 0 : korean alpabet, word,(with the script and the meaning). It also provide example for daily speaking and exercise and exam for test your skills. If you study from the film, drama, etc, you wouldn't understand because the word they use and speak is very quick and sometimes to be uncommon to daily lives/ basic things

I've been there and here's what I've learnt:

You absolutely need spoken language practice, i.e. talking to native speakers (on Skype or in class). Korean pronunciation is nuanced and you have to get that right to be understood. The inverse also holds, Korea is a (relatively) large country with variety of accents and speech styles, you have to practice listening and comprehension.

There's more to language than learning words and grammar, for example, consider high/tall dichotomy, a person is tall, but a ceiling is high. Such "choice of words" is very important in a foreign language. It is even more important for some (Asian?) languages, certainly for Korean and Japanese, where large fraction of "grammar" is based on let's say "connectives" and "constructions", for example, go there before [you] eat lunch vs go there to eat lunch.

If you have to pick just one mode of learning, pick conversations.

Beyond that, you will need a good grammar book in a language that you understand well, ideally your native tongue, or failing that, in English. There are, sadly, many books of poor quality. I recommend the 3 volumes by Ross King & Jaehoon Yeon, they are pricey, but worth it.

After that, you'd need a decent dictionary (with usage examples), and to immerse yourself into the culture and language. I recommend travel. Songs and drama are very limited, for example there's no real intimacy in drama and you won't learn pillow talk. Likewise you'll never learn about taxes from pop songs :)

And finally, when you think you've mastered Korean, you have to learn Chinese. There, I've said it. Text in a typical Korean newspaper is 30% Hanja. Most key words are in Hanja, and "Chinese loan words" don't quite follow the same rules and native Korean words -- there are differences in grammar and pronunciation.

  • oh thank you so you said that I need learn Hanja then I should learning chinese first? ok I got it, I have a question what do you want to say here:" Likewise you'll never learn about taxes from pop songs" I understand all but I dont got it nothing and you said about Ross King, it is her website:rosskingbooks.com ? – simon Nov 30 at 15:55
  • No, "Ross King Ph.D." is one of the authors, the other is "Jaehoon Yeon Ph.D." , here are ISBN for newest editions: 0804844984, 0804845158, 0804842493 – Dima Tisnek Dec 3 at 1:32

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