6

I'd say "classical" hanja-eo (based on Middle Chinese eumhun readings) is quite easy to spot, although the accuracy is quite low. You've mentioned certain phonological and phonotactic features; there are a few more which I can go through: lack of 쌍 consonants restricted set of 받침: limited to those of Sino-Korean and corresponding to Middle Chinese's, i.e. ㄴ,...


4

They are similar dishes. For example, here are pictures of two Korean dishes: 돼지국밥 is probably the most famous dish from Busan: it is a soup (국) containing pork (돼지) and rice (밥) as main ingredients. 돼지국밥 is similar to 설렁탕, except that the latter is made with ox meat and is a Seoul dish. Honestly, I can barely see a difference from the pictures. The 탕(...


4

I see that you quoted the examples from this site: http://www.howtostudykorean.com/unit1/unit-1-lessons-9-16/lesson-16/ If you look at the wordings in detail, it already explained that you CANNOT identify which one, 적 or 스럽다 can be used if you never met that word. However, there is one characteristic for 적이다/적으로. 적 is the hangul of 的, which is a ...


3

I could find some other examples for compound adverbs that are made by reduplication(첩어) of a noun + adverbializer suffix (이): 간간이, 겹겹이, 골골샅샅이, 곳곳이, 길길이, 나날이 , 다달이, 땀땀이, 몫몫이, 번번이, 샅샅이, 알알이, 앞앞이, 일일이, 줄줄이, 집집이, 짬짬이, 철철이, 틈틈이 Besides, in Cambridge Language Surveys The Korean Language (page 257) you can find some explanations about this word structure. PS: ...


3

국 and 탕 more or less mean the same, 탕 being the honorific form. 탕 isn't used as commonly as 국 though. For example 나머지는 내가 준비할 테니 가서 탕을 좀 내와라. means the same as 나머지는 내가 준비할 테니 가서 국을 좀 내와라. However when they are used to incidate specific dishes, they do have a slight difference in meaning. According to 표준국어대사전, the suffix -탕 is used to mean 국 which ...


2

In addition to other good answers, there are also many common syllables that are never used for Hanja, so if you encounter them it's a good sign that the word is not Sino-Korean. Some of the "gaps" are not easily explained (at least I don't know any explanation): it's just the way it is. Examples include 센, 더, 뭉. Note that slightly different syllables ...


1

You already know the word '바라다' In Korean, '~건대' emphasizes the following sentence or showㄴsthe purpose of speaker. So, the word '바라다'+'~건대' = '바라건대' means that the speaker hopes to do something and he's about to say what it is. There is thread of connection between '바라건대' and 'hopefully'.


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