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12

The '한자 키' on a Korean keyboard is usually the same key as the one that may be the right 'Ctrl' key on many countries' keyboards. This picture shows the key with both labellings : If you type a hangul character that you want to 'convert' to hanja, and press the '한자 키' while it is highlighted, a menu will come up: This shows the possible hanja for this ...


4

I'm sure you've seen that there numerous, Korean key layouts available. I only know "2-Set Korean". I would have only left a comment, but then I couldn't drop in this screenshot. All the Korean typing programs that I've seen use 2-Set Korean. But then again, I've never seen a Dvorak typing tutor (without argument, that is, perhaps because I haven't ...


4

Ultimately this comes down to a question on romanization. Pinyin is a romanization system for Chinese. There are a few different systems of romanization for Korean. The two most prevalent are McCune–Reischauer (M-R) and Revised Romanization of Korean (RR). Revised Romanization is what is used in South Korea officially now (it replaced M-R in 2000). The ...


3

Most Korean people almost 99% they use 2-set Korean, it is equivalent to qwert type keyboard. Dvorak is not directly equivalent to 3-set Keyboard but it design for efficiency. However it takes time to get use to it, also it require extra step to setup most of time. I believe most Korean people use 2-set with qwert keyboard. For fast typing they use ...


3

As always, it depends on the context and how much other information is available. Also, usually, how much the words actually sound similar. (Consider how often native English speakers mix up its/it's, there/their/they're, etc.) For example, if you type 녹색 as 녹섹 in a sentence, almost everyone will still understand the sentence, because 녹섹 is clearly a typo ...


2

Practice, practice, practice. But! Practice smart. Despite other's recommendations, I would highly discourage anyone from buying stickers or Korean keyboard – typing is supposed to be in your muscle memory, any good touch typing course will tell you not to look at the keyboard at all. If you don't know how to touch type properly in English yet, I'd recommend ...


1

If you want to write "ㅁㅓ". First you haveto write "ㅁ" fiirst. Then press the "space bar" and press "backspace" to erase space. Then you have to write ㅓ. That is the way how you can write ㅁㅓ. I hope you undersand this.^^


1

If you don´t have a Korean physical keyboard, I would recommend you to buy one online or add those Hangul stickers to yours and practice like @Salvatore DePalma said. This can help for a while. But in my opinion, the crucial thing is to memorize the position of the keys so that you can type in Korean as fast as you would in your native language using any ...


1

I recommend getting a cover for your keyboard, but it's really important that you don't look unless you absolutely need to (muscle memory). Really it comes down to practicing every day, starting slow by typing little things. I've used the Practice section on the TypeRacer website for some guidance. It's just a website where you practice typing quotes as fast ...


1

First I'm Korean. I think my keyboard layout same as yours. left hand controls 모음(ㄱ,ㄴ,ㄷ,...,ㅎ) right hand controls 자음(ㅏ,ㅓ,ㅗ,ㅜ,...,ㅣ) So, almost Hangul type sequence like left, right, left, right. Practice typing in Korean helps you get used to it.


1

Just to compliment the existing answer: The 한자 key seems to work slightly differently based on the program it's being used on The accepted answer shows how it is used in notepad in Windows, and it seems to work in 3 cases: Type a Korean syllable block and press 한자 key: eg: type 한, then before pressing anything, while the computer is still accepting inputs ...


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