11

I think the dialect tag is a good one to put here as it basically summarizes the idea of the differences here: enough to be like two separate dialects (simplifying, Korean has 9 dialects). To my understanding Korean spoken in the North has aimed to be 'pure' in a sense - that is refraining from having loan words from the Japanese language (English too, ...


7

This list obeys the standard grammar rules promulgated by the National Institute of Korean Language (NIKL) and NIKL's Standard Korean Language Dictionary (February 2019). If you disagree with the correct spellings, please visit their website and leave your suggestions in Korean there. A few Twitter bots (1, 2, and 3) also deal with spellings. You can find ...


7

Hanja certainly isn't necessary, but it can be helpful. Many Koreans say they don't know any/many Hanja - they may have learned them in school, but they've forgotten most of them since. Certain generations didn't even have to learn them, and North Koreans don't learn them at all. So it is certainly possible to get by without learning any Hanja. However, ...


5

I find learning 한자 is not necessarily useful on its own, but knowing 한자어 (not the characters but the meanings behind syllables) really helps me be able to figure out words I've never seen before. For example, lets say you know the words 교실(classroom) and 화장실 (bathroom) You might be able to decipher that 교, is probably something to do with education because ...


4

I think you have misheard. Koreans speak very fast, and I understand why many foreigners will hear the pronunciations wrong. It is NEVER OK to pronounce 나, 너 as "da, deo". By the way, 너, 노 are of different pronunciations, in case you don't know.


3

It depends on what you mean by "da, deo". Standard Korean "ㄷ" is not voiced very much at the beginning of words, British English "d" is weakly voiced, Castilian Spanish "d" is very strongly voiced and can get softened ("lenited") into a voiced fricative sound. Standard Korean "ㄴ" can be weakly denasalised, as said in the link in the comment above. The ...


2

This has to do with batchim (받침) rules! As you might already know whenever ㅈ is in the batchim position (bottom position in a block), as it is in both 맞다 and 맞네요, it's sound changes to ㄷ for ease of pronunciation. Thus, you would expect the pronunciations to be 맏다 and 맏네요 (keep in mind that the letters do not ACTUALLY change, just the sounds). The reason ...


2

As a born and raised in South Korea. The difference between South and North are.. (imo) accent like British English and American English North Korea use try not to use words from other countries. They translate to a pure Korean word but it sounds weird. Each country use own dictionary. A long time ago in 1980ish, they try to make one unify dictionary (http:/...


2

Here is a bit more technical approach. Let's see 맞다 first. There is a grammatical rule called '음절의 끝소리 규칙', meaning 'Ending sound of a syllable rule'. Basically the rule says that every single consonant in the end of a single syllable, such as ㅌ in 밭, should be pronounced as one of these: "ㄱ, ㄴ, ㄷ, ㄹ, ㅁ, ㅂ, ㅇ". In case of 맞다, the syllable 맞 ends with ㅈ, and ...


1

Here's a summary I created awhile back, with some (perhaps overly verbose and subjective...lol) commentary on the subject as well: https://plus.google.com/111681410172584068167/posts/bpPqmGdtTXu It's worth printing out as a reference, I think. Here's the relevant part to your question: ㄷ-sound^ before ㅁ/ㄴ pronounced ㄴ. 닫는 is “단는", 빛는 is “빈는", 바닷물 is “...


1

I do not know about the importance of Hanja in general Korean, but it no longer has a place in North Korean. Kim Il-sung considered Hanja unwanted for two reasons: It's too complex. Part of the illiteracy of the Chinese is blamed on the complexity of their characters. This was deemed unwanted for Korean. It's an artefact of Japanese occupation. While I ...


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