14 votes

What, if any, are the primary differences between Korean as spoken in the North and that spoken in the South?

I think the dialect tag is a good one to put here as it basically summarizes the idea of the differences here: enough to be like two separate dialects (simplifying, Korean has 9 dialects). To my ...
Colbi's user avatar
  • 893
7 votes

Wiki: Common spelling errors that Koreans (are likely to) make

This list obeys the standard grammar rules promulgated by the National Institute of Korean Language (NIKL) and NIKL's Standard Korean Language Dictionary (February 2019). If you disagree with the ...
7 votes
Accepted

Importance of learning Hanja (한자) for Korean learners

Hanja certainly isn't necessary, but it can be helpful. Many Koreans say they don't know any/many Hanja - they may have learned them in school, but they've forgotten most of them since. Certain ...
gaeguri's user avatar
  • 6,004
5 votes

Importance of learning Hanja (한자) for Korean learners

I find learning 한자 is not necessarily useful on its own, but knowing 한자어 (not the characters but the meanings behind syllables) really helps me be able to figure out words I've never seen before. ...
choicehoney's user avatar
3 votes

What, if any, are the primary differences between Korean as spoken in the North and that spoken in the South?

As a born and raised in South Korea. The difference between South and North are.. (imo) accent like British English and American English North Korea use try not to use words from other countries. ...
tk0221's user avatar
  • 595
3 votes

How to pronounce "나, 너" etc. correctly

It depends on what you mean by "da, deo". Standard Korean "ㄷ" is not voiced very much at the beginning of words, British English "d" is weakly voiced, Castilian Spanish "d" is very strongly voiced ...
Michaelyus's user avatar
  • 2,418
3 votes
Accepted

Is there a j sound in 맞네요?

No, there is never a j sound in 맞네요. In normal speech, it is pronounced /man-ne-yo/ (as you noted), and if you insert a small pause after 맞, it can sound like /mat-neyo/, ㅈ sounding like a soft /t/. ...
Tony's user avatar
  • 2,427
2 votes
Accepted

Why is there no 't' sound in 맞네요, and there is in 맞다?

This has to do with batchim (받침) rules! As you might already know whenever ㅈ is in the batchim position (bottom position in a block), as it is in both 맞다 and 맞네요, it's sound changes to ㄷ for ease of ...
Josh Everly's user avatar
2 votes

Why is there no 't' sound in 맞네요, and there is in 맞다?

Here is a bit more technical approach. Let's see 맞다 first. There is a grammatical rule called '음절의 끝소리 규칙', meaning 'Ending sound of a syllable rule'. Basically the rule says that every single ...
PenPoint's user avatar
  • 758
1 vote

Why is there no 't' sound in 맞네요, and there is in 맞다?

Here's a summary I created awhile back, with some (perhaps overly verbose and subjective...lol) commentary on the subject as well: https://plus.google.com/111681410172584068167/posts/bpPqmGdtTXu It'...
B. Alvn's user avatar
  • 1,237
1 vote

Importance of learning Hanja (한자) for Korean learners

I do not know about the importance of Hanja in general Korean, but it no longer has a place in North Korean. Kim Il-sung considered Hanja unwanted for two reasons: It's too complex. Part of the ...
Mast's user avatar
  • 110

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