8

It's a word play on 물먹는 하마, a very famous brand of moisture absorber (see picture). [So the word play is that like this "water eating hippo" product absorbs water, the olympic stadiums in a post-olympic country absorb monetary resources.]


5

The word for dizzy in Korean is 어지럽다. You don't need to use 자꾸 - this word indicates something that "keeps happening" - I think you would say "자꾸 어지러워" if you were getting dizzy a lot, as in describing a symptom or a problem you've had lately. So you just need the word "어지럽다" to say "I am dizzy (now)", but you should change the ending: 어지러워요 is a polite ...


5

See 더러 in Naver dictionary: (사람을 나타내는 체언 뒤에 붙어) 어떤 행동이 미치는 대상을 나타내는 격 조사. As far as I can remember it's only used for verbs like 시키다, 묻다, or 부탁하다, that is, where a person is speaking to another. In most cases, I think it can be replaced by 에게 without change of meaning. So the sentence means: [It] can be as difficult as telling an egg to become a ...


5

날 is a shortened term of 나를(나+를), meaning 'me'. 나 means I, and 를 is attached right after 나 in order to transform the meaning to 'me'. 거 and 것 is the same: roughly means 'thing'. And 을 is omitted - it should be right after 거(것) but there is nothing wrong with omitting 을 since 을 is a postpositional particle(조사) and omitting 조사 is grammatically allowed. So, a ...


4

As you say, I think the business of 'spirit capturing' is easier done for sentences than phrases. How about: Not till then shall our lives begin to bear such fruit as shall please the Lord. By itself '비로소' might have the feel of 'thenceforward' (in terms of elevation). I am afraid 'that's all there is to it' (from your comments) would not do for two ...


4

I think "한국어 도서" is similar to "books in Korean". "한국 책" can be used in first and second senses, but not third sense. I'm Korean native, and I think another native wouldn't think "한국어 도서" as "originally published in Korean but translated." Word "Korean" means 'something about Korea', 'Korean language', 'Korean people', but there is no equivalent in Korean, ...


4

It's exactly the same as using "why" with a coma; that is, why used as an interjection. 왜, 그 있잖아, 코 큰 사람. Why, you know, that guy with a big nose.


4

비가 오다 or 비가 내리다 means "to rain". 비(rain) is the subject here which 오다(comes) or 내리다(falls). 와라 is 오다 + -라. Verb + -라 is the form used to command or suggest someone else to do something. When used with something that cannot be commanded, it means one hopes that to happen. So, 비 와라 or 비 내려라 means "I wish it rains/it would rain". -나 has ...


4

It means: Instead of "뭐라고?", you can also say "어?" with voice raised at the end. Probably it's best to consider that "하면서" is omitted after "'어?'라고". "뭐라고?"라는 말을 대신하려면 = in order to replace the phrase "뭐라고?" "어?"라고 [하면서] 끝을 올리(면) = say "어?" and raise the end -면 됩니다 = [you] ...


3

Good afternoon, The sentences can be translated as below: Man: Sister, what are you doing? I'm bored. Let's get out and play badminton. Woman: Fine. But you should not be upset like last time even if you lose. Here "졌다고" should be translated as "even if you lose", and "없기다" as "there should not be such a thing that". Added: Some example sentences....


3

(이)라고: Used when you intend to convey a message to an or a group of audience. So for the verbs 말하다, 쓰다, 생각하다, 믿다, 부르다, etc. ~라고 is often used. Example: 오빠가 이 걸 안 할 거라고 그랬어/말했어 ==> I said my brother won't do that 병이 나아질 거라고 굳게 믿어 ==> I strongly believe that the illness will get better. 1. Why is (이)라고 used here as in "누구라고 해요"? In short, it is a habit....


3

Yes, that means 'Please give(tell) me the phone number of Hangook(Korea) University.' If you are able to read a bit complicated Korean, it would be helpful to see this Q&A: http://krdic.naver.com/rescript_detail.nhn?seq=4663 Short summary of the above document will be this: '드리다' can stand for 1) "giving something to elders" when its usage is verb, and ...


3

Haha. This is just a comedy show. There is no idiomatic meanings here The key word is 맛. 맛 means taste like spicy(매운맛), salty(짠맛), sweet(단맛) etc. but, sometimes, 맛 is used for the other purpose. especially, about feeling. 쓴맛 : you may hear "인생의 쓴맛" which means "life is bitter." For example, Let say, you tried hard to enter the company or pass a exam but ...


3

In Korean, adding -는 것 is a 'nominalisation' (a way of making a 'noun') that still keeps the sense of the action 'happening'. 'To play' in your examples is called the infinitive in English, and 'playing' is called the gerund. Both of these forms can represent a noun form of a verb that keeps the sense of the action 'happening', so they are both good ...


3

I am afraid to say this, but there are more than three mistakes. First of all, 서울 식당 is used too many times, although it is not a grammatical mistake. Even if 서울 식당 is a name of a restaurant, the repetitive use of proper names for places seems clumsy. You may use 이 식당, 그 식당, 그곳, or 거기 in place of 서울 식당. Nonetheless, it is advisable to avoid using pronouns (...


3

It literally means "A rag is still a rag, even if you wash it". 빨다 here means "to wash (clothes)". Figuratively, it means "No matter how hard you try to improve a thing in a certain way, its innate nature will not change". However, 걸레 has another slang meaning, which translates to "slut". So the innocent looking sentence could also be interpreted as: "A ...


3

The '쯤' of '나 하나쯤이야' means 'approximate degree' meaning the same as '정도' that comes right after nouns, '-(이)야' shows the perception of looking down on someone/something or taking /someone/something slightly, and '하나' means 'one', and in this case, showing the reason of the perception, which is that the person/thing is only one'. you can make various ...


3

Both of them are idioms. The sentences "하루가 멀다 하고" and "사흘이 멀다 하고" mean someone feel a day(하루) or three days(사흘) is too long to wait for them, so they do something repeatedly frequently. For example, 민수는 하루가 멀다 하고 컴퓨터 게임을 한다. means Minsu cannot wait for playing computer games, so he cannot help himself from computer games. Using "...


3

This is a version of a more familiar ending: ~고 있다. Often this ending is translated as "is doing" - like the present continuous in English - but of course it isn't exactly equivalent; it means something that is ongoing, and can be used for verbs like 알다 / 모르다 (know / not know) where in English we wouldn't use it. So 부모님이 ~ 모르고 있다 will mean "my ...


3

Basically it means that he went around saying he would confess. 다니다 is one of a few verbs that often gets paired up with another, to link the actions together. It emphasizes that the person is going around from place to place while doing the action.


3

@jick answer is great, but to supplement "뭐라고?" mean "pardon?"(It is the same until raising the end note) "어?" mean "eh?" Neither is formal.


3

기분이 좋아요 is a kind of in-between case. It is primarily used for the first person but also for the third person sometimes (e.g. 영철이는 오늘 기분이 좋아요). This is one difficulty aspect with the emotional words. We can't blindly lump all emotion words in the same group - there are some that are used a little differently. For your sentence, we can say it a few different ...


3

X-에게 있어 (or 있어서, the original form before contraction) signifies "considering it from the standpoint of X" or "as it pertains to X". X-에게 있어서 = X-에게 (to X) 있다 (belongs/pertains) + -아/어서 (as). (It sets the basis of the discussion to X) It is a literary phrase which might be translated as "for X", "when it comes to X", ...


3

Had no clue at first sight. Searched up a bit to figure it out. “참코: 애 발매일.” 참코: 참가參加 joining 코드code; passcode required to join. 애: the name of the Stray Kids’ digital single “Mixtape:애.” 발매일: 발매發賣 release-일日 date; release date. “Passcode hint — the release date of the Stray Kids’ digital single ‘Mixtape:애.’” Which is June 26, 2021. It’s 210626. There ...


2

I believe the phrase if only and only then finally fits well. 무엇인가 해야 (하다 + 그래야) 비로소 무언가를 이룰 수 있다. We must do something. If only and only then we can finally achieve something (we have been longing for).


2

From Naver's online dictionary: 잃다: (물건·집·자리 등을) lose; (빼앗기다) be deprived of 잊다 (기억하지 못하다) forget 잃다 is used when you forget or lose material possession. It is also used when you are unable to find the way to go your destination. 잊다 is used when you forget something you knew previously but cannot recall it at the moment This post has some ...


2

First of all, according to this post on Naver knowledge search, 재부 is, as you guessed, a North Korean version of "재산". So it can mean property, assets, riches, etc. The phrase "최대의 ~" can mean "The greatest ~" - so here, "the greatest asset" or "the greatest riches". So the above phrase could be "Knowledge is the greatest asset of creation and building",...


2

I'm pretty sure 없어서는 is a typo of 있어서는. ~에(게) 있어서는 is a common idiom meaning "when it comes to ..." or "to ..." as in "그들에게 있어서는 매우 중요한 문제였다 (To them, it was a very important matter)".


2

Yes, the "proper" table manner is to use the spoon and chopsticks separately. However, when people eat ramen, they don't usually care about table manners, just like people don't look for forks and knives in McDonalds. I think people generally don't mind table manners that much, unless you're meeting, say, your father-in-law. After all, whether someone ...


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