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8

흔 means ten in obsolete Korean. These words still have the influence of '흔'. 서른(서흔->설흔->서른) 마흔 예순(엿흔->예순) 일흔 여든(여흔->여든) 아흔 And 열(10), 스물(20) don't follow this rule because the origin of these two words are totally different from others. There are other 'pure Korean' numbers like 온(100), 즈믄(1000) but modern Koreans do not use them anymore. Only from 열 to ...


8

Old Korean at least had 온(100) and 즈믄(1000), and maybe more, though I don't know if higher numerals were recorded elsewhere. Your native Korean friend is correct in that 온 is no longer used to mean 100: its only meaning in modern Korean is "whole", as in "온 천지가 눈으로 가득하다 (Everything is covered in snow)". As for why, my uneducated guess is that Koreans were ...


6

It is a Chinese short-hand representation of tallying, or counting the number of something, if the number is not too large More details can be found here: https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%E6%AD%A3 From the page, Usage notes (tally marks, 5): The successive strokes of 正 (East Asian tally marks 1 through 5) are used in China, Japan, and Korea to ...


5

From what I've heard, it comes from the field artillery's way of saying numbers in the military. The number system that goes 하나, 둘, 삼, 넷, 오, 여섯, 칠, 팔, 아홉, 공(0), is commonly called 포병 숫자 (although lots of other army units use this system too), because they do that in the army to make the numbers heard extra clear in a noisy war environment. It's akin to the "...


4

Yes, it is natural. 한국에 두 번째로 갔을 때, or 두 번째로 한국에 갔을 때 When you use ordinal numbers, you should put space between number(첫, 두, ...) and '번째' like 첫 번째, 두 번째.


4

AFAIK, this is as far back as you can go. Korean is linguistically regarded as a language isolate, which has no sister languages anywhere else in the world. The comparative method, which is used for reconstructing older forms of languages, does not work for Korean. The forms you find in the 옛한글 columns are the oldest attested forms of the words (from the ...


4

Learning hanja should be the last in terms of priority. As much as possible, you should try to learn Sino-Korean numbers and Native Korean numbers together. Both are used extensively in Korean, depending on what you are trying to say. If you have to choose just one, I would suggest Native Korean numbers since these will allow you to count ("Can you count ...


3

As the comments said, the first one means generic "money" (she's making the shape of a coin with her thumb and index finger.) The other two, I have no idea, but considering that the comics was full of absurdist humor, I think the author just made up some nonsense gestures. (These two girls are aliens, after all, if I remember correctly.)


2

In this video, the teacher is trying to say the words slowly. 일곱 is an awkward word to say slowly, as it moves from one consonant to another. I think the '리' you are hearing is just a small 'artefact' of moving from the ㄹ to the ㄱ while keeping the sound voiced all the way through. You're not imagining it, but it's not significant either. Try to hear it as ...


2

Ordinals 番번 The most basic and universal word to give things their ordinals is an ordinal number marker noun “번(番)”, which sounds a bit casual. 삼보대련 1 번(삼보대련 일 번, 三步對練一番.) 삼보대련 number one 第제🌟 You may also use “제(第)-,” which is an ordinal number marker prefix. 기본권법 제5(기본권법 제오, 基本拳法第五.) 기본권법 the fifth …for what? 式식🌟 But come on, this ...


2

You may want to memorize at least up to 엿새 (six days), and maybe 열흘 (ten days). There aren't really much more. I learned 열하루, 열이틀, 열사흘, 열나흘, and 보름 (fifteen days) at school, but they're very rarely used. I think almost all native Koreans would be able to understand phrases like "그 이후 이레가 지났다. (Seven days have passed since.)" On the other hand, most ...


2

For math, definitely for Sino korean number first, it's pretty much impossible for you to use native Korean number to use in math unless you are learning very early elementary school math(K1~K3 I guess?) Native Korean number can be used for daily conversation or for a short single numbers to maybe less than 100, or when you speak elder's age as polite form(?...


2

They don’t know, too. As to why no one answers this question asked a week ago, it’s because it’s something native speakers would find natural but don’t know the exact rules for that. Don’t sweat it though. It’s just a tendency, if not preference, however; you can use both native and Sino–numbers to count forwards or backwards if that doesn’t involve units (“...


1

The tilde, in Korean, has the same usage with the en dash “–”. It represents a range or span of numbers or time. “두 개에서 세 개” Use the numeric determiners (“관형사”) “두” (“two …”) and “세” (“three …”) with the same unit “개” and link them together with “에서” (“from …”). Though you could also use “부터” (“from …”) in some cases, this is not the case; “에서” is always a ...


1

2~3개: 둘에서 세 개, 두세 개 sounds okay. 1~30번: 일 번에서 삼십 번까지, 일 번부터 삼십 번까지 sounds okay. '까지' might be omitted. For the former case, you choose either one of multiple options(2개, 3개). For the latter case, you (probably) don't. I have to take a look at the whole sentence to explain more.


1

"두" or "세" is a 관형사, which means you can never add a suffix after that. So, "두에서 세 개" is plainly incorrect. If you're reading it aloud, "두세 개" is the best expression. Because the Arabian numerals (like "2" or "3") are frequently read as Chinese numbers (일, 이, 삼, ...) you will be also understood if ...


1

https://ko.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/%EC%88%98%EC%82%AC_(%ED%92%88%EC%82%AC) (wikipedia about 한국어 수사 - 수 meaning number(s), 사 meaning word.) So it definitely says over 100 often uses 한수사(한 meaning from chinese character, 수사 I already explained), for example, 백한 마리 달마시안, 삼천만 원 and as a native Korean speaker I can confirm I’ve never seen such a case that does not ...


1

For pages, I guess you can say several ways. For example, to count from 1 to 10, you can either 한 페이지 두 페이지 세 페이지 ... 열 페이지 or you can say 첫번째 페이지 두번째 페이지 세번째 페이지 ... or simply 한장 두장 세장 네장 ... 열장 oh well.. now you can so 한 페이지 두 페이지 세 페이지 네 페이지 ... 열 페이지 For counting objects, it also depends on what kind of "object" is it. However, in general, you ...


1

석 is one of the old quantifiers conventionally used by the elder people in Korea. There are many old quantifiers in Korean. For example, other than 세, there is also 서 which has the meaning of three. Some old Korean proverb: 구슬이 서 말이라도 꿰어야 보배 → (literally) It takes more than three 말 (18 liters) of pearls to make a necklace. → Nothing is ...


1

Is that formal enough to order from an older lady? Yes, it is and that's how you do it whenever you order something. why did she use the other number system? First of all, excuse me for not knowing the exact name for this system. But I know that this is the numbering system you use for counting. 12 pencils = 연필 열 두자루 12 trees = 나무 열 두그루 12 cats = ...


1

And, did I use the correct number system originally? No, you use native numbers with 개. 한 개, 두 개, 세 개, ... You should have said 열두 개 주세요 instead of 십이 주세요.


1

Teacher is correct. That sound is 7(일곱). Just accept his pronunciation.


1

It sounds like he's just dragging out the ㄹ


1

Below are all the numbers expressible in Korean(a lot). You can see that the highest number is 10^68, which consists of 68 zeros. Most of there words have disappeared because of lack of usage. However, some still exist in everyday talk, only that they don't represent actual numbers anymore(ex-'찰나의 순간' stands for a very short period of time, and you can ...


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