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9 votes
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Are all words from Chinese characters (한자어) nouns?

No. There are some adverbs (부사) that are 한자어: 역시 (亦是) - also, likewise 내일 (來日) - tomorrow (this is sometimes a noun, sometimes an adverb) 심지어 (甚至於) - even as far as 항상 (恒常) - always Also, numbers ...
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5 votes

What are the common tennis terms in Korean?

We commonly use English loanwords when it comes to sports. advantage set / tiebreaker set : 어드밴티지 세트 game 게임, 경기 set 세트 match 매치, 경기, 시합 love (the term used for 0 or a no score situation) : 러브게임, ...
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4 votes
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Etymology and Differences, '나래' and '날개'

According to the National Institute of Korean Language's etymology page, 날개 comes from -+-개, which is 다(to fly, Modern 날다) + -개(suffix meaning "a tool to do such action"). Other words with -...
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4 votes
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이것 책상이다 - 이: noun or adjective

By itself, 이 is called a 관형사 - this is sometimes translated "undeclinable adjective", but it includes what are called determiners (like "this") in English as well as certain so-called adjectives, like ...
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3 votes
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is 명사 and 수사 a part of speech

It is not wrong to think so, because they have similar properties. There have been several ways to classify Korean words (ref.); some of them seem to agree with your view. The current Korean textbooks ...
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3 votes

What is the difference between ways to say "motivation", e.g. 자극 and 동기 부여?

‘동기 부여’ is not a single word; just give the OP the literal meanings of each words it has! The best way to figure out subtle difference between words is to know their etymologies. I give you very ...
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2 votes

What is the difference between ways to say "motivation", e.g. 자극 and 동기 부여?

Some 자극 could be 동기 부여, but not all 자극 are. 자극하다 means affecting something for a reaction, while 동기 부여 means giving 자극 to something in order to making it want to do something. 자극 is closer to mere ...
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  • 121
1 vote

When to use 은/는 or 이/가 after subject

이/가 is used to "mark" the subject (preceding 가) that you're attempting to direct a little more attention to. Often omitted. 은/는 is a "stronger" marker, I would say. It can be used to direct your ...
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1 vote

When to use 은/는 or 이/가 after subject

The subject marker 이/가 is for new information or focusing on subject. The topic marker 은/는 is an auxiliary particle 보조사 and can replace 주격조사 이, 가. It is for old information, contrast/comparison or ...
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1 vote

What are the common tennis terms in Korean?

I believe most Korean use the tennis terms in English when playing tennis. I've been playing tennis with my Korean and American friends, but I have never used any terms in Korean.
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  • 261
1 vote

What is the difference between 볼 and 뺨?

To my understanding, these two words for cheek can be used interchangeably. They have the exact same meaning. Originally I thought the difference was that 볼 was derived from Chinese, but this is not ...
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