Hot answers tagged

9

No. There are some adverbs (부사) that are 한자어: 역시 (亦是) - also, likewise 내일 (來日) - tomorrow (this is sometimes a noun, sometimes an adverb) 심지어 (甚至於) - even as far as 항상 (恒常) - always Also, numbers are considered to be 수사 or 관형사, not 명사, so the numbers 일, 이, 삼 etc. are all 한자어. I could find one other 관형사 that is a 한자어: 순 (純) - pure: 순 한국식 (pure Korean-...


5

We commonly use English loanwords when it comes to sports. advantage set / tiebreaker set : 어드밴티지 세트 game 게임, 경기 set 세트 match 매치, 경기, 시합 love (the term used for 0 or a no score situation) : 러브게임, 무득점 경기, 러브 ex) 이번 게임은 러브로 끝났다. 15/30/40 : 0(love), 15(fifteen), 30(thirty), 40(forty) deuce : 듀스 advantage in / advantage out : 어드밴티지 인, 어드밴티지 아웃.


4

According to the National Institute of Korean Language's etymology page, 날개 comes from -+-개, which is 다(to fly, Modern 날다) + -개(suffix meaning "a tool to do such action"). Other words with -개 suffix are: 덮개, 지우개, 이쑤시개, 베개, 마개, 깔개, 끌개 나래 is just another form of 날개, which appeared as 래 in the 15th century, which is unfortunately is as far as we can ...


4

By itself, 이 is called a 관형사 - this is sometimes translated "undeclinable adjective", but it includes what are called determiners (like "this") in English as well as certain so-called adjectives, like 새 (new) that cannot be used as the predicate, and thus do not include any 어미 (verb endings). 관형사 always precedes a noun/substantive: 이 꽃 (this flower). 이것 ...


3

It is not wrong to think so, because they have similar properties. There have been several ways to classify Korean words (ref.); some of them seem to agree with your view. The current Korean textbooks and standard dictionary, however, separate 수사 from 명사. One point I would like to mention first is that 첫째 is 수사, 관형사, and 명사; 하나 is 수사 and 명사. I will show you ...


3

‘동기 부여’ is not a single word; just give the OP the literal meanings of each words it has! The best way to figure out subtle difference between words is to know their etymologies. I give you very literal meanings of them here. ‘계기 (契機)’ [계ː기] or [게ː기] 契 (맺을 ‘계’): to settle. 機 (틀 ‘기’): cause, reason, mechanism. 어떤 일이 일어나거나 변화하도록 만드는 결정적인 원인이나 기회. A decisive ...


2

Some 자극 could be 동기 부여, but not all 자극 are. 자극하다 means affecting something for a reaction, while 동기 부여 means giving 자극 to something in order to making it want to do something. 자극 is closer to mere stimulation than a motivation. 이 곡은 사람의 감정을 자극하는 음악이다. 대자연의 아름다움이 시인의 상상력을 자극했다. 선생님의 칭찬이 동기 부여가 되어 나는 더욱 열심히 공부하였다. 성과나 업적에 따라 보상을 해 주면 일을 하는 사람에게는 ...


1

이/가 is used to "mark" the subject (preceding 가) that you're attempting to direct a little more attention to. Often omitted. 은/는 is a "stronger" marker, I would say. It can be used to direct your listener's/reader's attention to what the overarching topic is that you're going to talk, perhaps at some length, about. It is also used to contrast. 이 컴퓨터(가) ...


1

The subject marker 이/가 is for new information or focusing on subject. The topic marker 은/는 is an auxiliary particle 보조사 and can replace 주격조사 이, 가. It is for old information, contrast/comparison or focusing on description. 저기 집이 있습니다. 그 집은 산 위에 있습니다. 누가 파티에 갔어? -> 지민이가 파티에 갔어 (focus on the subject) 지민이 뭐 해? -> 지민이는 파티에 갔어. (focus on the description)


1

I believe most Korean use the tennis terms in English when playing tennis. I've been playing tennis with my Korean and American friends, but I have never used any terms in Korean.


1

To my understanding, these two words for cheek can be used interchangeably. They have the exact same meaning. Originally I thought the difference was that 볼 was derived from Chinese, but this is not the case. Online it looks like some Koreans argue that 뺨 is to be used when speaking of the cheek in a two dimensional sense, as in "Her cheeks turned red." ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible