9

This comes from German: hof(bräuhaus) Etymologically, the Old Norse word hof is the same as the German word hof, which originally meant a hall and later came to refer to a court (originally in the meaning of a royal or aristocratic court) and then also to a farm. So, apparently it is unrelated to "hop" which I'm kind of surprised to learn.. hop (n.1) ...


9

The Sino-Korean vocabulary is from Chinese characters. They're essentially the same words, only pronounced differently. 漢字 is pronounced 한자 in the Korean way, "kanji" in the Japanese way. In other words, the sound for the Chinese character 漢 is "han" in Korean, and "kan" in Japanese. In fact, 산 used to be spelt 山 in Korean too, and still is, to some extent. ...


8

This is a great example of how a historical/literary/cultural/geographical reference is picked up by another cultural sphere and takes on a life of its own. La ligne Maginot, as the Encyclopedia Britannica states, is an: elaborate defensive barrier in northeast France constructed in the 1930s and named after its principal creator, André Maginot, who was ...


7

North Korea and Russia are strategically close countries, but because North Korea uses the same language as Korea, linguistically it is not helpful to learn Russia 북한과 러시아는 친하지만, 북한과 한국만 같은 언어를 사용하기 때문에, 러시아를 배운다 해도 북한 언어를 배우는 데 아무런 도움이 되지 않는다.


7

There are some words borrowed from Russian in North Korean, but not nearly as many as there are words from English in South Korean. The North Korean government has really emphasized their independence, and made efforts to rid their language of "impure elements". So they have sometimes created replacement words for foreign-borrowed words. So overall, ...


7

Not sure if 언니 is from お兄 but the National Institute of Korean Language says that 언니 may be a contraction of 웃 (older) and 누이 (sister), which is pronounced as /운누이/.


3

서반아 as Spain is rarely used, but 서반아어(Spanish language) is still fairly used; Especially in academic with a short form - 서어. SNU's Hispanic Language and Literature Department is 서어서문학과 in Korean, since most of universities changed their department's name to 스페인어학과. It's like nobody calls France as 불란서 in these days, but 불어(french language/불란서어, 프랑스어) is ...


3

In modern Korean, "서바나" is barely used. It seems that most of younger Korean cannot notice what "서바나" is, whereas most of them know what and where "스페인" is. It's kind of an attempt to write non-korean word(especially the name of nation) in chinese character(한자) when Korea is unfamiliar with the Latin. And, not important, but it ...


3

I found good article about it in Korean http://topa.co.kr/archives/536 호프 in Korean, it is from (Hofbräuhaus). According to article(its not news btw) "과거의 신문을 검색해보면 1986년 11월 5일에 OB맥주가 서울의 동숭동 대학로에 ‘OB호프’라는 이름의 생맥주 체인점을 열면서 사용하기 시작한 것이 그 효시라는 기사를 발견할 수 있습니다." Which means one of famous beer name OB beer open bar name 'OB호프' then 호프 became 호프


2

The knowledge of Russian will not help. 문화어 doesn't use Russian words widely, although you can find some of them in the news or everyday speech (뜨락또르 for tractor, 꼴바사, rarely, for sausage, 욜까 for Christmas tree). By the way, many Russian words that were being used in 1950-70-s, aren't used today. The vast majority of loanwords in North-Korean is also ...


2

언니 is told to have been used for males(or by males, not sure) in the joseon dynasty, but the meaning changed over the last few hundred years... This is very common in Korean language. Not sure about the Japanese term, though. It is possible, because the Korean and Japanese language has always affected each other a lot..... Could be the other way around.


1

Definition #2 from the Naver Dictionary entry for 언니 is as follows: 2 .남남끼리의 여자들 사이에서 자기보다 나이가 위인 여자를 높여 정답게 이르거나 부르는 말. ex) 동네 언니 ex) 그보다도 언니! 남편 되시는 분 말이에요. This is the typical way for female, Korean native speakers to address other women with whom they are less familiar while employing a friendly tone. In Korean, the terms 언니 and 형님 show respect for a ...


1

Here is a statistics of percentage of Konglish in Korean, but it is written in Chinese and of course the data could not be accurate. This statistics only accounts for daily conversations https://zhidao.baidu.com/question/37755715.html 50% of usual conversations are local, while among the another 50%: Hanja accounts for 50 - 60% Originated from English -> ...


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