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7

First, Hangeul was not originally written as Kanji. Kanji is the term for Chinese characters used in the Japanese language; Hanja is the term for these characters used in Korean language. Hangeul is another writing system for Korean. 不 actually has 2 pronunciations in Korean: 불 and 부. This can be traced back to Middle Chinese, where the pronunciation ...


3

주간(週刊) means 'weekly' 주간(晝間) means 'daytime' As you can see, they have completely different hanja and so have completely different meanings. This is very common in the korean language, and the meaning of most words are just dependant on context.


3

There's a misunderstanding here - 「不」 is not the etymon of 「아」. Please carefully notice the reconstruction notes; reproduced below with some additions for emphasis: The second character (冬) is a common Old Korean phonogram for the syllable *tol. The first syllable (不) is a logogram conventionally reconstructed as *AN because the sequence 不冬 is used in ...


2

I would say this one. It provides the frequency of all words, including Sino-Korean words, from various samples. According to the data, some of the most frequently used S-K words of two or more syllables include: 問題, 社會, 自身, 境遇, 女子, 程度, 人間, 時間, 自己, 政府, 世界, 事實, 始作, 時代, 只今, 關係, 經濟, 男子, 以上, 運動, 地域, 文化, 映畵, 方法, 內容, 過程, 作品, 政治, 生活, 女性, 大統領, 親舊, 記者, 意味, 重要, ... ...


2

First off: TL; DR. Transliterations are preferred. Well-known on’yomi音読み names are sometimes read with Hanja sounds. Foreign words in the Korean language By the standard of the NIKL, you should transliterate foreign names and words into Hangul, preserving their original pronunciations — with some exceptions. The exceptions Japanese words Some on’yomi音読み (“...


2

This isn't Korean, it's Japanese. The characters are 「長翁齋・장옹재」 , pointing to the given name of an Edo Period Japanese metalsmith/artisan named 「鈴木長翁齋」 (Japanese: 「鈴木長翁斎」, Suzuki Chō'ōsai). If you Google image search "鈴木長翁斎", you can see some of his silverwork (and his son's work, who is self-styled as Chō'ōsai the Second, 「長二齋」 or 「二代鈴木長翁齋」). For ...


1

If someone is your lover: 소중한 사람 귀인 is more like VIP i think.


1

You cannot combine any things like that. And 귀인 is idiomatic.


1

Yes, since the 1990s, I think, the National Language Institute (국립국어원) made it a standard to Koreanize foreign names following their original pronunciation. So all official speeches and writings (and nowadays in most informal conversations too) now use names like 도쿄, 상하이, 베이징 even though they used to be referred to as 동경, 상해, and 북경. This seems to be the ...


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