6

I'm not an expert on old Korean, but some of them look recognizable. 집 떠난 날 = day of departure from home 서울 떠난 날 = day of departure from Seoul 상해 착(着?) = arrive at Shanghai? 상해 발(發) = departure form Shanghai? 마르세이유 상륙(上陸) = arrive at Marseilles I think, there were no standard Hanguel grammar at that time. Not even the official language of the nation. ...


3

I can't decipher all of it, but the ㅅㄷ combination is an old way of writing the ㄸ character; so it would say "떠난 날". (I think it's 떠난 날, but with 아래 아, a dot under the consonant, an old vowel which became ㅏ) I wonder if 짐 is actually 집? It looks like a handwritten style ㅁ, but it's a bit different - so 집 떠난 날 would be the day he left his home.


2

The original Hangul, called 훈민정음Hun-min-jung-eum, had more diverse combinations and few more characters compared to current usage, such as ㅴ, ㆋ, ㅿ, ㆍ,ㆆ. We believe that these allowed Hangul to express sounds more precisely than we can do with current Hangul. However, this also caused Hangul to be more difficult to learn, and even the linguistics experts had ...


2

It is 얌체 (someone who is despicable because they act very selfishly). I think most Koreans will have no problem at all because the word is a very common one and there's no similar sounding one - in other words, it is helped by preexisting knowledge. Just from the look of it, I might have thought it was 얍체 or even 뱝체, except that 얍 is rare and 뱝 is probably ...


2

This is how people write ㅉ. (I found these images from Google.) There isn't really any other way AFAIK or at least I haven't seen it.


1

If you are OK with using it online, I would suggest giving Naver's online translate tool's handwriting recognition a try I don't have a touch screen nor linux computer at hand, but this works completely in a browser so I am hoping it is OS independent A quick test on Chrome in Windows seems to work quite good: Go to https://papago.naver.com/ and click on ...


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