11

I think the dialect tag is a good one to put here as it basically summarizes the idea of the differences here: enough to be like two separate dialects (simplifying, Korean has 9 dialects). To my understanding Korean spoken in the North has aimed to be 'pure' in a sense - that is refraining from having loan words from the Japanese language (English too, ...


10

A series of phonological changes regarding word-initial /ㄴ/ and /ㄹ/ are known to have started around Seoul, and spreaded to other regions, as most sociolinguistic changes happen. The change was a very slow and steady one, recorded at least since the 15th century, shortly after the invention of Hangul, which much more properly records Korean phonology than ...


6

I'm not an expert on old Korean, but some of them look recognizable. 집 떠난 날 = day of departure from home 서울 떠난 날 = day of departure from Seoul 상해 착(着?) = arrive at Shanghai? 상해 발(發) = departure form Shanghai? 마르세이유 상륙(上陸) = arrive at Marseilles I think, there were no standard Hanguel grammar at that time. Not even the official language of the nation. ...


5

I wonder in which dialect they are pronounced the same and in which differently. Older speakers in 서북 방언, 동북 방언, 육진 방언, and 제주 방언 distinguish them according to this paper. Location of dialects Also, how is it treated in Seoul? There is no verbal distinction between ㅔ and ㅐ in Seoul, again, according to that paper. And finally, if they are both ...


4

설농탕 is a word used in past. grammatically 설렁탕 is correct. 설농탕 and 설렁탕 have the same meaning overall.


4

It might be a stretch to say that Korean would have a term for hens that shares origins with 抱. 北燕朝鮮洌水之間 talks about a region roughly corresponding to modern day Liaodong, conquered from Gojeoson by the State of Yan. This war happened around 400 years before Fangyan was written. This means that the people living there would have about 400 years to change to ...


4

This k-palatalisation (ㄱ 구개음화) is reportedly a huge part of the Hamgyeong dialect. However, one has to distinguish the Hamgyeong dialect group from the Yukchin/Yukjin/Ryukjin (육진 / 六鎭) dialects. They are geo-politically within 함경북도 North Hamgyŏng province, but dialectally they share some features with the Pyeong'an dialect group: P'yŏngan dialects are ...


3

I can't decipher all of it, but the ㅅㄷ combination is an old way of writing the ㄸ character; so it would say "떠난 날". (I think it's 떠난 날, but with 아래 아, a dot under the consonant, an old vowel which became ㅏ) I wonder if 짐 is actually 집? It looks like a handwritten style ㅁ, but it's a bit different - so 집 떠난 날 would be the day he left his home.


3

The phrase you might be most likely to hear is 혼저 옵서예, which is the 제주 equivalent of '어서 오세요'.


2

As a born and raised in South Korea. The difference between South and North are.. (imo) accent like British English and American English North Korea use try not to use words from other countries. They translate to a pure Korean word but it sounds weird. Each country use own dictionary. A long time ago in 1980ish, they try to make one unify dictionary (http:/...


2

We do not know how 아래 아 was pronounced when it was made, but yes, in Jeju dialect it is still used. And it is pronounced as [ɒ], or [어]. 아래아's one usage example is 한/글, a Korean word editor program. Its logo looks like this. 아래아 is usually used to make a logo look "archaic". Another example of 아래아 being used in a logo for a product called '참 크래커' is ...


2

I'm korean student in high school:), thank you for your attention to Korean. not 엄칭히, it is 엄청. There are various expression '엄청'. Because local speaking is very deveoloped in Korean. we called that is 사투리(so I think, if you really listening 엄칭히, that is local speaking). In Busan, I tell 엄청 to 억수로. Like, 엄청 맛있네! (very delicious!), = 억수로 맛있네! I hope that ...


2

The original Hangul, called 훈민정음Hun-min-jung-eum, had more diverse combinations and few more characters compared to current usage, such as ㅴ, ㆋ, ㅿ, ㆍ,ㆆ. We believe that these allowed Hangul to express sounds more precisely than we can do with current Hangul. However, this also caused Hangul to be more difficult to learn, and even the linguistics experts had ...


1

I think, in this context, 그렇게 and 이렇게 doesn't make much difference. For example, let's consider this fragment (changed the last word to make it easier to explain): "어디 가는가?" 그렇게 말하는 [것] = speaking like "어디 가는가?" Here, "어디 가는가?" is the quotation. And then the following "그렇게 말하는" describes the sentence just quoted: &...


1

The merge of ㅗ and ㅓ, and ㅡ and ㅜ has been been completed yet. They are getting similar but still distinguishable. For example, the pronunciation of '정은' in Hamgyeong and Yanbian dialect may sound like '종운' to Koreans but they are not completely same. The pronunciation of 'ㅓ' are getting close to 'ㅗ', but I disagree that ㅡ and ㅜ are being merged into ㅡ. ...


1

'Very' is a good translation. As you said, I couldn't find it in a Korean-English dictionary, but it is in a Korean dictionary. 엄청이 is Chungcheong dialect for 엄청. As a side note, I would recommend you try to use the Korean dictionary, because there are more entries and so that you can practice thinking in Korean.


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