9

"네?" is a semi-formal and probably the simplest way. If you talk to friends, you can simply say "응?". If you talk to someone really close to you, you can also say "뭐?"


7

I'll start by depressing you further - I've been learning Korean on and off (and admittedly there has been a lot of 'off') for more than 10 years now, and I'm still pretty terrible! So if you really have the intention to learn Korean well, there's a warning there... intentions + time do not necessarily equal progress. There's also a warning there for me not ...


7

I spent a great deal of my time in Korea walking from one place to another and I often had chance to talk with people. These are just my observations, which admittedly might be skewed due to the fact that I am a foreigner and what Koreans use as small talk between each other might not be the same things they say to foreigners like myself as small talk. ...


6

You have to say "안녕히 가세요" to the ones leaving a place as well. The followings are different ways to say goodbye in Korean: 안녕 (informal). (Well-being, peace, health.) 안녕히 계세요. (Stay in peace.) 안녕히 가세요. (Go in peace.) 잘 있어 (informal). (Stay well.) 잘 가요 or 잘 가 (informal). (Go well.) 나 먼저 가 (informal). (I will go first.) 다음에 봐 (informal). (see you next time.)...


6

여기 있습니다 is idiomatic, translates to "here you go". 세 권 있습니다 is "there are three", so it's a bit unnatural to say that in that situation.


6

In addition to @WEBjuju's answer for addressing the parents in another room: The terminology that refers to "parents of a student" is 학부모(學父母) An alternative that can cover "guardians and (older) siblings* of a student" is 학부형(學父兄) * the word calls for "father/brother of a student" but sibling is implied. 학부모 is used more formally in a context of ...


6

Time spent studying and listening in the native language is the only way to improve your speaking ability when studying a language with completely foreign grammatical constructs. if you're studying spanish as an English speaker, you could kind of just wing it, learn a bunch of words, and translate from english to spanish directly and get by. But for korean ...


5

I've mostly heard 비비다 used for food and for body parts: 밥 비벼 주세요! - Please mix my rice [with the sauce] - note this doesn't have to be 비빔밥, but any sauce; my children ask for it with 불고기 sauce. 눈을 비비다 - to rub your eyes 눈 비비지 마! - Don't rub your eyes! 손을 비비다 - to rub your hands


5

The -십시오 ending is a polite imperative, for polite requests and instructions. You would only use this ending when you're talking to someone else; the sentence therefore means "Do not touch me". This wouldn't make sense if 'me' was the subject, but as you rightly say, the -는 marker doesn't have to go on subjects; it can be used for just for emphasis. So the ...


5

You could use "... 말고 ...": 이거 어머니에게 가져다 드릴래? (아니) (그러니까) (내 말은) 어머니 말고 네 동생. As mentioned in the comments above, several phrases such as 아니/그러니까/내 말은 can also used to mean "I mean." However, they all have other uses, so they can be ambiguous. 그러니까/내 말은 can be used where you simply explain your word again. For example: 그러니까 내 말은 어차피 ...


5

My Korean teachers always made me say: 다시 한번 해 주세요? (Please say that again one more time?)


4

You don't necessarily need to ask directly. For example: (죄송합니다,) (잘) 못 들었어요. ((Sorry,) I didn't hear what you said.) There is no explicit request, but they will understand that you want to listen once more.


4

Good afternoon! "좀" is a kind of subtle word. I'm sure it will be generally okay to use, but some people will think they are given some commands and not like it. Well, this is just a rare case so please do not care too much about it. Anyway, I think "안녕하세요~ 오늘 수업 자료 인쇄 부탁드릴게요 ^^" can be suitable for a message to parents. 자료 sounds better than 재료 because 재료 ...


3

To open a text message, I would greet with: 여러분 안녕하세요? 여러분 is "everybody" 안녕하세요? is the standard hello As for calling one mother back into the room, yes 어머님, 수업이 끝났어요 If you are calling a mixed bunch of women and even one man, perhaps "parents" is better 부모님, 수업이 끝났어요


3

The most commonly used expression for the verb "to smoke (a cigarette)" is (담배를) 피(우)다. Sometimes 담배를 태우다 is used too. In literary language, it appears in the form of 흡연하다. Also, very informally, 담배를 빨다 is used. The difference between 피다 and 피우다 in this context is minor, although 담배를 피다 is not considered the standard. As a side note, 연기 is the noun "smoke" ...


3

I asked a Korean person, so answering my own question: 가: 만으로 몇 살이에요? 나: 만 ㅇㅇ살이에요. Note, I was told this was rarely used, so could be a bit of an awkward question to ask.


2

It implies that the person is returning home (literally go into their house). Etymology is vague but I've heard of two origins: One from people meeting outside, in a coffee shop for example, and then when they part, they say they're returning home. Another is from the old days when there were no home phones. You had to use public payphone to make a call ...


2

Bad exercise. If that is a "one or more answer" question, then I, a Korean only educated in Korea, might choose both after 5 minutes of consideration. If not, a) is the right answer for education purpose explaining different usage of "있습니다". In real life, b) also could be the natural conversation. 네,세 권 (여기) 있습니다.


2

http://www.howtostudykorean.com/unit-5/lessons-109-116/lesson-109/ The grammar that you are seeking is ㄴ/은/는가 보다, but it is usually shortened to 나 보다. Its basic meaning is "I guess...", however you should use it only when you have a clear evidence to support your guess. Ex: 지금 야채가 없나 봐요. -> I think(I guess) there is no vegetable now. You guess it because,...


2

Various options exist: [ethnic origin]계 [nationality]인 e.g. 중국계 영국인. An official-sounding term, relatively neutral. explanations involving parents / ancestry and birth. E.g. 부모님이 중국 사람인데, 저는 영국에서 태어났어요. explanations using 오다 for the country of residence (which is assumed to be nationality) and having ethnicity as "default". E.g. 중국 사람인데, 영국에서 ...


2

이면 : a) 드러나지 않는 내부의 속사정 not well-known thing. 이 소설은 권력의 이면을 그리고 있다. This novel describes dark side of a power. 성공의 이면에는 고뇌가 있다. Different side of success contains pains. b) 물체의 속이나 안 inside of a thing = 내면 c) back of a thing 이면지를 활용 usage of a back side of a printed paper. @When I find examples, the word 이면 means negative or neutral neutral : 잘 관찰해 ...


2

On the Internet, when we want to address anyone whom we don't know, we use 님. For daily life conversation, There are other expressions you may use, such as 아저씨, 아줌마/아주머니, 할아버지, 할머니. If talking to a younger person, you can use 누나, 언니, 형, 오빠 if you want a closer relationship. Otherwise, you may use 그쪽. If there is more than one guy, Easy, you may use 여러분....


1

I think this question is hard to answer, because I think we(Koreans) always care about the relationship between the listener and ourselves. What happens when the listener says, "누구요?" and you need to clarify? Say we're talking on the phone. I would always try (maybe unconsciously) to figure out the relationship between the listener and myself. Is the ...


1

It has two meaning: One is "than," and the other is "to guess." The first 보다 is used with comparison: "more (adjective) than (phrase/noun)" "(phrase/noun)보다 더 (adjective)하다." The second 보다 is ending expression: "~하나보다," "한가보다." 하나보다 means "To guess something/someone does ~." 한가보다 means &...


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