4

Also it's worth noting that "그리하다" is a very formally-sounding (almost archaic) word. In most situation you would rather use "그러다". So, "단지 너를 위해 그랬다." sounds more natural in most situations. "단지 너를 위해 그리하였다." sounds somewhat archaic and poetic. (Not sure if "그리하였다" is one word or two... maybe both are correct.) "단지 너를 위해 그리했다." is possible, but it's a ...


4

했다 is just a shortened expression for 하였다. Similarly, we can shorten 되었다 to 됐다. We hardly use 하였다 in spoken Korean unless you are in a formal conversation or speech. It sounds as though you are reading a book or keeping a distance from the listener. Both 하였다 and 했다 are common in written Korean. In formal writings, it is recommended to use 하였다 instead of 했다.


4

Language is always changing. The object 것 (thing) and subject particle 이 (marking the subject of the clause) as you state, are being contracted. But the standard language (표준 언어) is 것이. While 게 (when used as the contracted form of 것이 is not standard language but a form of the standard adopted by generations that "made it their own". I am also ...


2

1) 우리 아빠는 학생이시다 My father is a student 2) 이시다 + 어요 (politeness suffix) -> 이시어요 -> 이셔요 -> 이세요 https://www.italki.com/question/438903


2

Yes, they are identical in meaning. It is a contraction, like "don't" in English. In formal writing, contractions are used less often, also like in English. You probably wouldn't see "don't" in a legal document, right? It's the same story. Similar are: 이것이 >> 이게 and 저것이 >> 저게 Also, with the topic/contrast marker: (이/그/저)것은 >> (이/그/저)건 And with the ...


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