4

It's called 사이시옷, a way to express 사잇소리 phenomenon(which itself is written with 사이시옷, btw). 사잇소리 현상 happens very frequently, with or without 사이시옷. Here are some examples with 사이시옷: 나무 + 잎 = 나뭇잎 제사 + 날 = 제삿날 비 + 물 = 빗물 하교 + 길 = 하굣길 시계 + 바늘 = 시곗바늘 Things get really confusing when we delve into this a bit more. For example, when 사잇소리 phenomenon happens ...


3

I guess it indicates being a compound word. Because it is made of two compounds "들어"+"오다", sometimes you can even split the word and add something in between! 어서 들어들 와요. = 어서들 들어와요. = Please come in, you all. 나사가 (들어는 갔지만/들어가긴 했지만) 여전히 흔들흔들한다. = The screw did go in, but it's still moving a bit (i.e., it's still loose).


2

Actually, there is a lot of compounded verbs in korean. But most of them are considered to be weird when it comes to spoken language. The basic principle is right though But it is much more natural when you said '속아서 얻어맞다' than '속아얻어맞다' The word such as '뛰놀다' and '속아넘어가다' is kind of idiom, because they are used in numerous situations.


2

To echo jick's and Rathony님's answers, I believe that the dash is an indicator of 들어오다 being a compound of the verbs 들다 (to enter) and 오다 (to come). The dash is of course not used in actual written Korean. It is just there as a matter of linguistic indication as far as the dictionary is concerned. Similar lexicographical marks are commonly found in English ...


2

I think we probably end up discussing the meaning of "able." In English, for example, where can you go from troublemaker and innkeeper? If you say promisemaker and promisekeeper your teacher will mark you, as did StackExchange's spellchecker just now? (It seems OK with spellchecker.) Nonetheless and nevertheless, but not anytheless. But who is to say ...


2

The correct answer to the title: No. Answers to your questions: Yes. 저는 저 자신이 무서워요 is like "I am afraid of myself"; 저는 저 자신을 무서워해요, "I fear myself." They are semantically (almost) the same, but Google search results suggest that the former construction is preferred when the subject is the first person. Those two adjectives, 무섭다 and 슬프다, ...


1

I don't think "making my own compound" is a good idea, because it becomes much more ambiguous. In already existing compounds, the meaning is set by previous usage: if you say "go play", people understand that it means "go and play", not "play while going somewhere". In newly made compounds, there's no previous usage to guide us. For example, if you say "...


1

Verbs can combined in quite a few ways, including using 어(서), 고, and many of the auxilliary verbs are attached using these two clausal conjunctives, often making something close to a new word. So, following these rules all kinds of combinations are possible. Calling something "a new word" would be extreme and also unnecessary. Is "eat and run" a new ...


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