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6 votes
Accepted

What does "vely" means in Korean Instagram names?

Your guess is correct. That's "lovely" which korean speaking "러블리". And, some word before 러블리 like "유미(yumi)+러블리(lovely)" is going to be shorten "윰블리(yum+vely)". So, I think, vely is Konglish.
Newkie's user avatar
  • 406
5 votes

What is the difference in speaking between the question endings 나, (으/느)냐, and (는/ㄴ)가?

Let's look at the dictionary definitions first. -냐 (‘이다’의 어간, 용언의 어간 또는 어미 ‘-으시-’, ‘-었-’, ‘-겠-’ 뒤에 붙어)  해라할 자리에 쓰여, 물음을 나타내는 종결 어미. -나 (주로 동사 어간이나 어미 ‘-으시-’, ‘-었-’, ‘-겠-’ 뒤에 붙어) ...
MujjinGun's user avatar
  • 7,527
4 votes

What is the difference in speaking between the question endings 나, (으/느)냐, and (는/ㄴ)가?

On -나, we need to distinguish at least two different types of situation. In type I, it is used between two equals. A: 가 보았나? B: 난 아직 못 가 보았네. A군, 자네는 가 보았나? You see this type of use in the ...
Catomic's user avatar
  • 1,337
3 votes
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Apart from '귀차니즘', are there any other kinds of 'isms' in Korean?

Well, I've heard 먹고사니즘 which means (something like) the idea that making a living (and feeding yourself) is the most important thing and other stuff can wait. There may be others, but fixing a Korean ...
jick's user avatar
  • 7,412
3 votes
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What is the difference in usage between the endings 다고 and 대?

Catomic's answer showed many good examples of using -다고 inside a sentence, so I'll just talk about using it at the end of the sentence. If you end a sentence with -다고 (or -라고/-자고/-냐고), I think it ...
jick's user avatar
  • 7,412
3 votes

How to say "Why not?" in Korean?

For Case 1, I believe "그럼 안돼(요)?" would work. Literally, "Is it not allowed?" Just as you mentioned at the end of the question, this phrase can also indicate annoyance; it could also mean a genuine ...
jick's user avatar
  • 7,412
3 votes

How to say "Why not?" in Korean?

Well I don't think there would be an exact match; the closest could be "그렇지 않을/못할 이유라도 (있나)?" This might be used fairly well in situation 1, but in situation 2 it wouldn't be used often. B would end ...
Jonghwan Choi's user avatar
3 votes

Should I learn korean with K-POP and dramas only or I need read a book school too?

I've been there and here's what I've learnt: You absolutely need spoken language practice, i.e. talking to native speakers (on Skype or in class). Korean pronunciation is nuanced and you have to get ...
Dima Tisnek's user avatar
3 votes

Should I learn korean with K-POP and dramas only or I need read a book school too?

You should study korean through the books like Korea Learning book, It teach basic lessom from 0 : korean alpabet, word,(with the script and the meaning). It also provide example for daily speaking ...
blanke F blanke1000's user avatar
3 votes

Should I learn korean with K-POP and dramas only or I need read a book school too?

Yes. I think so : I believe that we can not learn foreign language through TV dramas or songs. They can be a useful catalyser, but In my thought, we need at least one grammar book.
HK Lee's user avatar
  • 3,051
3 votes
Accepted

"Save the day" (like Superman)

I don't think there is a natural way of translating this and would be one of those phrases that needs to be translated on a case by case basis. For example You really saved the day (because you ...
Steven Gao's user avatar
2 votes

Apart from '귀차니즘', are there any other kinds of 'isms' in Korean?

The word 귀차니즘 has been around for about a decade now, I think, and it's been quite popular among younger generations. I've heard 먹고사니즘 too lately, as jick mentioned, and there should be other words ...
Jeonghyeon Lee's user avatar
2 votes

Apart from '귀차니즘', are there any other kinds of 'isms' in Korean?

A search in Naver Dictionary shows: 커넥션니즘: connectionism 이마지니즘: Imazhinizm 헬리콘니즘: Heliconism None of those are even common words in English, so it seems to have pretty limited productivity. A far ...
ryanbrainard's user avatar
  • 2,049
2 votes

Is there a female equivalent of '인마'?

Basically, in Korean, there is no word with gender. When you say "놈" in your context, it means a "person", not a "man". Therefore, "인마 (or 임마)" as the short form of "이놈아", can be likely interpreted ...
justinyoo's user avatar
  • 121
1 vote

What is the difference in usage between the endings 다고 and 대?

하다 has a sense of 'to say.' If Youngjoo says: 만수가 똑똑하다 (Mansoo is smart) reporting it would have the base form of: 영주가 만수가 똑똑하다고 하다 (Youngjoo says Mansoo is smart) which may become, depending ...
Catomic's user avatar
  • 1,337
1 vote

What is the difference in usage between the endings 다고 and 대?

-대 is simply an abbreviation of -다고 해 in Korean. For example: 철수가 밥을 먹었다고 해요. 철수가 밥을 먹었대요. Check out the answer of the National Institute of the Korean Language(국립국어원): '-대' is an abbreviation ...
Suhjin Park's user avatar

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