8

The word you are looking for is 시리다, meaning chilly or achingly/painfully cold. Rather than cold pain where cold complements and characterizes the pain, this one is the other way round: it is more directly about the cold that is characterized by pain. 시릴 수 있어요 would, as you might expect, mean It might get painfully cold. The word is usually used to describe ...


8

Derivation of 좋아하다 좋다 is an adjective that means good. Appending the 하 to its infinitive form 좋아 creates a compound, where it is given a notion of feeling. Thus, 좋아하다 has a "raw" meaning of something like... to feel good about. Apply that to some object and one would quickly find that they like that thing. Hence ultimately, 좋아하다 has come to adopt the ...


7

From Naver's online dictionary: 어원 : ←괜 [<空然] +하-+-지+아니-+하- Seems to be derived from 괜하지 않다 Also, from here: -찮다 is simply a contraction of -치 (cf. "-지 않다") + 않다 (않다 -> 아니하다 "to not be"). "괜" is a contracted form of the noun 관계 (關係) "relation, connection." Written out, the word's entire original form would be: "관계하지 아니하다," meaning "to ...


6

미남이시라구요 is splited into 미남 + 이다 + (으)시 + (이)라구요 이시라구요 is derived from the verb 이다(is). 시 is the honorific form, giving respect to that 미남. 라구 comes from the quotation grammar (Someone said ...) for 이다, namely (이)라고. You see 구 instead of 고 since 구 is the colloquial version of 고. So a more accurate translation will be: It is said that he is a handsome man.


5

They are largely used interchangeably, and 똑같은 can be used instead of 동일한 in your example. There are some subtle differences however. When comparing two or more objects (either abstract or concrete), if there are no differences at all, you can say they are 똑같다. You can generally use 동일하다 in this sense too. But if there are only few differences, which make ...


4

By itself, 이 is called a 관형사 - this is sometimes translated "undeclinable adjective", but it includes what are called determiners (like "this") in English as well as certain so-called adjectives, like 새 (new) that cannot be used as the predicate, and thus do not include any 어미 (verb endings). 관형사 always precedes a noun/substantive: 이 꽃 (this flower). 이것 ...


4

Usually words that end in 는 are "subjects" or "adjectives". It's probably worth distinguishing between two completely different '는' you will see (i.e. they are homonyms - they look the same, but are different constructions with different meanings). The first one is one form of the 은/는 'Topic marker'. This marks the topic, or the thing that you want to draw ...


4

First, the choice of -다 as "base dictionary form" is, in a sense, an arbitrary convention. Unlike English, Korean verbs always require a suffix. You will never see someone just saying "많", "없", or "아름답". It's simply not grammatical at all - that's like someone saying "Engl" instead of English. Because of ...


3

1. ~적이다 can go with 한자어 공격적이다 - correct 공격스럽다 - wrong 공격답다 - makes sense 공격 is neither a feeling, an object nor a person, but an act. 공경적이다 - makes sense, not common though 공경스럽다 - wrong 공경답다 - makes sense 공경 is neither a feeling, an object nor a person, but an act. 2. ~스럽다 can go with abstract concept, feeling, or an object 사랑적이다 - wrong 사랑스럽다 - ...


3

미남이시라구요 consists of one noun, two particles, and two verb endings. Let's decompose it like this: Take the noun 미남 and attach a particle (a copula) 이다, to make 미남이다, which makes it an adjective("descriptive verb"). Take the adjective 미남이다 and stick a subject honorific verb ending -시-, which becomes 미남이시다. Take the adjective 미남이시다 and stick a vulgar quotation ...


3

"혹 잘못이 있어도"는 아래 문장들과 의미가 같습니다: 혹시 잘못이 있어도 혹시나 잘못이 있어도 혹여 잘못이 있어도 혹여나 잘못이 있어도 ... 일상 생활에서는 보통 '혹'이라고 혼자 쓰이기 보다는, '혹시', '혹여나' 등으로 더욱 자주 쓰입니다.


3

관형사 and 형용사 are different parts of speech (품사)1. Both could be compared to adjectives in English, but some 관형사 like 그 are more similar to English determiners. But they are distinct parts of speech in Korean. 관형사 are modifiers which just have a base form; they cannot have any 어미 (verb/adjective endings) added on. They must precede a noun/pronoun. Some ...


2

Basically, '좋다' is a predicate. It can be used as an adjective, an adverb, and a verb. As others told, basically 좋다 is an adjective in many cases. However, if you try to use it to describe a behavior, then it is verb. For example, 나는 네가 좋다. (I like you.) It can also be felt like an adverb when you translate the sentence in English. 나는 기분이 좋다 (I feel good.)...


2

좋다 -> adjective, A(이/가) 좋다 describes that A is good 예) 날씨가 좋다 -> the weather is good 성격이 좋다 -> (have) a good character 좋아하다 -> verb, describes the act of liking something/one 예) 너를 좋아하다 ->(I) like you 떡을 좋아하다 -> (I) like rice cake


2

혹 a wen, a lump, a bump, a swelling, a protuberance a hump maybe, if (=혹시 = ~이/가 ~도 = ~이/가 ~다 해도) *혹 잘못이 있어도 .. = 혹시 잘못이 있어도 .. = 잘못이 있어도 .. = 잘못이 있다 해도 .. They have the same meaning. sometimes (=간혹, 이따금) Here are more examples. http://endic.naver.com/search_example.nhn?sLn=kr&examType=example&query=%ED%98%B9&pageNo=1


2

I assume that you are asking if the second usage is also logically correct. There are no problems unless you have chosen an adjective/verb that is unused with 안. Unlike the English not, 안 cannot modify multiple adjectives/verbs at once; it modifies the nearest adjective/verb only. An appropriate connector is chosen based on the sentiments rather than on ...


2

You are confused by the unusual structure of the sentence: "-해야" and "-할 수 있다" are, in fact, not connected together here. I think it's easier to understand a slightly longer version: 이게 [똑똑해야 할 수 있는 일]이거든요. Now, 똑똑해야 할 수 있는 일 can be easily understood by rearranging: 똑똑해야 (이 일을) 할 수 있다. = [You] can do (this) only if you're smart. ...


2

From my viewpoint, it is incorrect to say "이게 똑똑해야 할 수 있거든요" (This does not use the pattern 해야 하다 as the others also said). The subject 이게 should not be the object for the verb 하다 (to do) or the subject for the adjective 똑똑하다, but he used it as the object for the verb 하다. I suppose he habitually uses 이게 to start that kind of sentence without ...


1

Yes, 무섭다 can mean both "scared" and "scary". Other similar words also behave the same: 재미있다 (interested / interesting), 지루하다 (bored / boring), etc. Normally, to say "I'm scared." you just have to say "무서워요." There's no reason to add "나는", because who else could it be? "I'm scary." is more tricky, ...


1

There is already a lot of good information in the other answers, but I'll add an additional perspective on ~적이다 and ~스럽다. ~적 attaches to a 한자어 concept noun (적 itself is 한자어 的 ) and forms the property associated with that concept. You can then use it with 이다 either at the end of a sentence, or as ~인 to modify a noun. You can also use it directly with other ...


1

It's not talking about physical attack, so can we say 공격적인? I think it depends on what kind of marketing we're talking about. In Korean, 공격적 is closely related to 공격 "attack", and describes a behavior that is combative, assertive, or full of confidence. In English the meaning is broader. For example, Merriam-Webster dictionary contains: marked ...


1

If you adding ~적 to a noun, you can change it into the meaning of “relating to, or having the properties of’ the original. ex: 공격 mean attack. so if you add ~적 into 공격, it mean aggressive. ~스러운 and ~다운 is simillar suffix. but it have difference. ~다운 means that a word refers to something that has an attribute as a word. ex : 어른 mean adult. if you add ~다운 into ...


1

That sentence actually doesn't use the pattern "해야 하다" (meaning 'have to') - it uses the ending -야 in conjunction with the verb 하다 "to do"; The clause ending (어/아)야 is used to express "you have to do the first thing for the second to be true"; e.g.: 잘 먹어야 건강을 회복한다 (you have to eat well in order to regain health). The first ...


1

Both '형용사' and '관형사' describes '명사' (noun) Technically, in Korea, '형용사' and '관형사' describes '체언' (noun, pronoun, numeral) It is common thing between '형용사' and '관형사' However, the difference between them is 'whether it is possible to be transformed' and 'whether it can be its position' In Korea, 형용사 can be translated to 'adjective'. It is 'similar' to English....


1

I think so. I think it is like difference of do not and don't. First one is more natural to me, too, but second one is ok. Additionally, There are 2,570,000 google search result for 비싸지 않고 맛있는, and 4,010,000 for 안 비싸고 맛있는. I think it is because 안 비싸고 맛있는 is shorter than 비싸지 않고 맛있는.


1

축축하다 adjective damp weather 축축한(=습한) 날씨 My back is damp with sweat 등에 땀이 축축하다 @습하다 : be a state containing small water. It is commonly used in describing things like weather. Air is humid so that the bread is wet 공기가 습해서 빵이 축축해 졌다. 촉촉한 : Suitable wettish condition Moist lips is a useful condition when we kiss 키스할때 촉촉한 입술이 좋다 I am in emotionally ...


1

똑 = very similar : It contains equality case. 같다 = seem, be equal 동일 : be equal, exactly one If we measure roughly, then we use 똑같은. If there is a precise standard, then we use 동일한. A사와 B사의 컵은 거의 똑같이 생겼다. Cups produced from company A and company B are almost the same. 이 컵들은 동일 회사 제품들이다. These cups are from company A. 그 들은 동일한 수법으로 범죄를 저질렀다. The ...


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