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4
votes
2answers
855 views

What's the difference between 상태동사 and 형용사?

Korean Grammar for International Learners calls descriptive verbs 상태동사: However, I thought these words were also often called 형용사 - so I got the impression that 상태동사 and 형용사 are basically the same ...
13
votes
3answers
2k views

How does 15th Century Hangul writing/type differ from modern Hangul?

Foreign visitors to Korea will often become quickly familiar with the look of early Hangul documents and prints, as (being rather attractive!) they are often used for decorative purposes. Nevertheless,...
5
votes
1answer
779 views

How many verb/adjective endings are there?

Every time I turn a page of a textbook, there's a new verb/adjective ending. How many are there, and is there an authoritative, complete list of them anywhere? I found one extensive list, but there's ...
8
votes
2answers
253 views

Are all words from Chinese characters (한자어) nouns?

It seems to me like all the common Chinese character-based words in Korean I've encountered are, in themselves, nouns (though many of them can be used with 하다 to create verbs). Even 'sayings' like ...
6
votes
1answer
419 views

Using Verbs as Nouns (gerunds, word forms, complementizers, verbal nouns?)

As far as I know, a gerund is a verb modified to be used as a noun. For example in English, by adding -ing, I like eating, eating is the object to like, but eat is itself a verb. However this is not ...
5
votes
2answers
269 views

Using 이다 with location : how do Koreans interpret sentences like 어디야? or 집이 서울이 아니거든요

Naively translated, "어디야?" "역이야" would be something like "Where is it?" "It's the station". But it would normally be understood as "Where are you?" "I'm at the station". Somewhat similarly, I've ...
6
votes
2answers
1k views

Do Korean sentences always end with a verb-like word?

I know Korean grammar usually requires sentences to end in a 'verby' word like an action verb (동사), descriptive verb (형용사), or 되다 (to become) or 이다(to be something). But can correct, full Korean ...
12
votes
4answers
5k views

What does it mean when we add 이/가 on to the object of the verb?

I've seen 그 것이 알고 싶다 translated as 'that's what I want to know', and 사과가 먹고 싶어요 translated as 'It’s the apple (in particular) that I want to eat'. In both of these sentences, it looks like 이/가 is ...
4
votes
2answers
2k views

Is there a special meaning of '이' when added on to names?

I saw this example sentence: 만철이는 중국에 사는 조선족이랍니다 (They say that) Mancheol is a Korean who lives in China. is '이' here the subject particle '이'? I think I have also heard people say things ...
8
votes
1answer
2k views

Are there any other honorific particles apart from 께서 and 께?

께서 is an honorific version of 이/가 : 아버님께서는 무엇을 하세요? What does your father do? 께 is an honorific version of 에게/한테: 할머님께 편지를 썼습니다. I wrote Grandmother a letter. examples from http://...
6
votes
1answer
231 views

Applying honorifics to 한 적, which is correct? 한 적 있으세요 vs 하신 적 있으세요 vs 하신 적 있어요

So we've got this awesome question over here: What is the meaning and etymology of 본 적 (없다/있다). It goes over the meaning and basic usage, but one thing I'm not sure about is how to properly apply ...
13
votes
2answers
470 views

How should I use the pronoun 당신?

This is an issue I run into occasionally when teaching others Korean, especially those who learned some Korean via music. I know that 당신 is an intimate form of "you." Since we avoid explicitly using ...
8
votes
2answers
1k views

What's the honorific to represent a female's older sister?

I got to know that Korean grammar uses an extensive system of honorifics and those are used to differentiate between formal and informal speech. So ways to formal speech is to honorific nouns and ...
5
votes
3answers
297 views

Is it true that Koreans might sometimes be cautious about actually saying the verb in a sentence?

Richard Harris, in his book Roadmap to Korean, makes an observation (under the heading 'Cautious to Conjugate') that Koreans in some situations try to avoid clearly saying a verb and its ending, ...
3
votes
2answers
352 views

Why do we even need subject particles (이/가)?

In German, Icelandic, Russian, etc, the default 'dictionary' form of the word is in nominative/subject form already. That is, when you see a word in the dictionary, it's already in subject form, and ...
13
votes
3answers
9k views

What is the difference between 좋다 and 좋아하다?

This is a question from the proposal phase. What is the difference between 좋다 and 좋아하다? How do we distinguish between them?
8
votes
4answers
3k views

What is the difference between 쇠고기 and 소고기 (both 'beef') - both are correct, but when would I hear one over the other?

This is a question from the proposal phase. What is the difference between 소고기and 쇠고기 ?
3
votes
2answers
91 views

Is there a single word or phrase for “logical thinking capacity”?

Is there a single word or phrase in Korean that means logical thinking capacity? For example, I could like to say "He has a strong capacity of logical thinking" ___이 강하다.
6
votes
2answers
2k views

Why isn't 안녕합니다 a proper response?

Or is it? The most common all purpose greeting in Korean is 안녕하세요/안녕하십니까? 안녕하세요. The initiator of the greeting uses it as a question and the receiver responds as an answer. Why isn't the ...
1
vote
1answer
1k views

What's the difference between these “break” verbs: 깨다/깨지다/깨뜨리다?

깨다, 깨지다, and 깨뜨리다 come up as "break" when looked up. What's the difference, how are they used?
13
votes
1answer
142 views

Are colors interchangeable

Red is 빨간색 or 홍색. Green is 초록색 or 녹색. Blue is 파란색 or 청색. In each case, the first version is "pure Korean" while the second version comes from Chinese. Probably there are many other examples. Is ...
6
votes
1answer
413 views

What are the different causal connectives and how do they differ in nuance?

I keep coming across new conjunctive particles (접속사) all the time. Especially for giving reasons there seems to be an endless number of particles that all differ in nuance. What are the most common ...
5
votes
1answer
645 views

Can I write “마음을 잡수시다”?

In What's the difference between 드세요 and 잡수세요?, We know that '드세요' and '잡수세요' are honorific ways to say '먹다'. Then, is it grammatically correct? 그분은 이제야 위기를 극복하려는 마음을 잡수셨다.
5
votes
3answers
2k views

Do the shapes of Hangul characters have any significance?

I can see that there is an obvious correlation between ㅜ and ㅠ, and ㅏ and ㅑ. But do all the vowels shapes in general relate to each other in any special way? What about the consonant shapes like ㅈ, ㅂ,...
1
vote
1answer
910 views

A way to remember the natural Korean numbers 스물 (20), 서른 (30), 마흔 (40) and so on?

I don't have any problem remembering the natural Korean numbers up to 12, as they are used in telling the time - and it's easy to work out those up to 19. But I have problems remembering 스물 (20), 서른 (...
1
vote
1answer
86 views

Is the 하소서체 speech level used in any modern setting?

Would I ever hear 하소서체 language used naturally in any modern setting, or is it just something that was used historically for talking to royalty?
22
votes
3answers
2k views

How are mathematical symbols read in Korean?

Mathematical symbols are used internationally but each country read them in its own way. Moreover it is often difficult to find a comprehensive list. I know that this question is very broad but I ...
7
votes
2answers
2k views

What's the difference between 드세요 and 잡수세요?

I thought 드세요 was the honorific way to say 'eat', but I've also heard '잡수세요'. What's the difference?
3
votes
1answer
113 views

Natural translation of 숨을 곳도 찾지 못해 나는

숨을 곳도 찾지 못해 나는 피하려고 애써 봐도 거부조차 할 수 없는 네게 갇혀버린 나 These are the opening lines of Shinee's Lucifer. What would be a natural way to precisely translate this phrase? Something like "I, who can't ...
10
votes
8answers
10k views

Why don't Koreans call their country 'Korea'?

The Wikipedia article on Korea states that South Koreans call Korea 한국, while north Koreans call it 조선. Do 'Korea', '한국', and '조선' all refer to the same thing? If so, how did the three different names ...
4
votes
1answer
461 views

What's the difference between [아/어]서, ~다가 and ~ㅆ다가 when describing one event happening after another?

These 3 verb endings can all be used when one event follows another, but what's the difference between them? [아/어]서 can be used causally, but I'm specifically talking about when it is used to say ...
13
votes
2answers
6k views

Difference between negating with 안 and -지 않다

There are two ways to negate Korean verbs: By prepending 안 ("안 춥다") By appending -지 않다 ("춥지 않다") Are there rules for which one to use? Or does the method used change the meaning of the sentence?
9
votes
2answers
513 views

How can we infer the pronunciation of now obsolete Hangul characters?

The original Hangul system contained several characters that stopped being used before audio recordings became available. What can we infer about their former pronunciation, and on what basis? This ...
5
votes
1answer
571 views

Is there any program for Microsoft Windows for dictating Korean text?

Neither Dragon NaturallySpeaking nor Microsoft Speech Recognition allows dictation to Korean text. Is there any program for Microsoft Windows for dictating Korean text? I am aware that there exist ...
12
votes
3answers
2k views

When to use ㅐ, ㅒ as opposed to ㅔ,ㅖ?

I'm sure everyone will agree that they sound similar enough to their own counterparts to be interchangeable. If there are no tangible rules that separate their usage, what are some tips to spot their ...
10
votes
2answers
7k views

What is the difference between -지 않다, -지 못하다, and -ㄹ/을 수 없다?

One aspect of Korean that seems to cause issues for beginners is how to correctly say they will not/cannot do something. (Personally, I feel I use them correctly, but this is a really common issue I ...
7
votes
2answers
2k views

Should I worry about local dialect (satoori)?

I'm going over to Korea to study in a few months. I'm going to be staying in Busan but I heard that they have a local dialect (satoori). I'm just a beginner. I'm going to be attending a language ...
9
votes
3answers
1k views

How is 들어가다 used as a farewell greeting?

From what I understand 들어가다 means "to go inside" (with 들어오다 meaning come inside) But I have seen conversations like this is basic Korean books: 가: 먼저 들어가겠습니다. 안녕히 계세요. 나: 안녕히 가세요. 조심히 들어가세요....
6
votes
3answers
937 views

Are there any online tools available for entering Korean text?

This issue came up somtime during the commitment phase. How do I go about entering Hanguel?
6
votes
2answers
6k views

What's the difference between the ways to say “try”, 시도하다, 노력하다, 하려고 하다, and 해 보다?

There's some confusion between different ways to say "try": 시도하다 노력하다 ~려고 하다 ~어/아 보다 Are they used differently, or are the interchangeable?
15
votes
3answers
23k views

What's the meaning of -아/어 가지고, which I hear a lot in spoken language?

I hear "가지고" used a lot in spoken language (almost never in written language); for example: 고기를 잡아 가지고 찌개를 끓였다. ([He] caught a fish and made jjigae (stew).) It's not hard for me to understand ...
10
votes
4answers
790 views

How do you count Korean age

Koreans count their age in a different way from Western people. What are the exact rules to count your Korean age? Is it just Western age + 2? A person born on Feb. 10, 1986 is 30 years old in ...
13
votes
2answers
17k views

When do I need to use the native vs Sino-Korean numerals?

The Korean language uses 2 sets of numerals: The native Korean numerals The Sino-Korean numerals When I want to express myself in Korean, I am often wondering which numeral system I should use. I ...
5
votes
1answer
688 views

Is hanja opposed in North Korea?

I've heard here and there that hanja was opposed in North Korea for some ideological reason or another, but the English language Wikipedia article on hanja seems to present a more nuanced situation, ...
10
votes
2answers
333 views

Are ordinary native Korean speakers capable of understanding individual Japanese kanji words in written form?

While learning Japanese, I've learnt some individual Chinese characters, and some Japanese words made out of Chinese characters. Are ordinary native Korean speakers, as opposed to someone who has ...
16
votes
4answers
6k views

When should I use Hanja instead of Hangul?

How can I know when to use Hanja over Hangul, or vice-versa? Answers giving a bit of history/thorough explanation would be greatly appreciated.
13
votes
2answers
601 views

Which do I choose “그” or “그녀”?

In English, we use "he" to indicate a man, and "she" a woman. If we use "he" to indicate women, it is grammatically incorrect. Let John be a male and Anna a female. John did an operation on the ...
16
votes
4answers
957 views

Is there any word that varies in length when written in hanja or hangul?

I've learned that due to Korean syllable structure, every hanja has exactly one hangul block long. Is there any Sino-Korean word (한자어) deviates from the rule (by colloquial sound change etc.) that ...
17
votes
3answers
405 views

How to translate generic “you” or “one” in Korean?

Generalities in English are often introduced using a generic "you" or "one". For example, "when one is hungry, everything tastes good" "when you are a young teacher, you have a lot of work" Is ...
23
votes
2answers
2k views

What are the biggest pronunciation / intonation features of English-speakers speaking Korean?

What pronunciation problems distinguish native speakers of English when they are speaking in Korean? I'm especially interested in the things that non-beginners of Korean use. There are two aspects of ...

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