All Questions

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
0
votes
3answers
2k views

What's the nuance of meaning of '잘 먹고 잘 살아' as a way to say goodbye?

Is '잘 먹고 잘 살아' necessarily sarcastic, or can it be said tenderly? Is it only ever said between romantic couples breaking up?
4
votes
2answers
6k views

What's the origin and meaning of '썸타다'?

Naver defines '썸타다' as: have a fling The action of pushing and pulling when a man and a woman who are attracted to but haven't started seeing each other. These seem to be different meanings. The ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

Is '들어는 봤어요' a good general way to say 'I've heard of it'?

I was wanting to say that I'd heard of (but not actually seen) a TV series. A friend suggested '들어는 봤어요'. Is this a good general way to say 'I've heard of it'? (I can't find 'heard of' in daum or ...
1
vote
1answer
695 views

is '얼마예요' formed by 얼마 +이다, or from a verb '얼마다'? Or some other way?

I was going to ask, as many have around the web, what the difference between 얼마다 and 얼마 is - but first, I'd like to understand the roots of the words. Is there a root noun "얼마" or a root verb "얼마다"? ...
13
votes
5answers
7k views

What is the difference between 방금 and 금방?

As far as I know, one of them means "a short while ago", the other "in a short time". Sometimes they are used interchangeably. I'm looking for an explanation of the two words, how they differ, and a ...
4
votes
1answer
607 views

How is the word 바라건대 ('hopefully') formed?

I know the word '바라다', meaning to 'hope'. 바라건대 is translated as 'hopefully', but how is it derived from '바라다'?
4
votes
3answers
242 views

Why does the word for kindness, 친절 (親切), include a character meaning 'cut off; to disconnect'?

친(親) - relatives, parents; intimate 절(切) - to cut; to slice; to disconnect How does the second character relate to the meaning of 친절?
7
votes
1answer
134 views

How can you show that you are correcting yourself? (Equivalent of “I mean..” in English)

In English you could say Can you give this to your mother? Sorry, I mean your sister? The listener can then understand that they are to give the item to their mother, not their sister. In Korean, ...
4
votes
2answers
1k views

Is it true that -먹다 can be used to show that you did something bad? What's the origin of this meaning?

I've read that "잊어 먹다" can be used to mean "forget", emphasising that it was a regrettable event. Is that a legitimate usage? In general, when would this form be used? I tend to think of eating as a ...
3
votes
2answers
1k views

What is the difference between - 내다 and - 버리다 to convey completion of an action?

What is the difference between - 내다 and - 버리다 to convey completion of an action? For example, would there be any identifiable difference in meaning between "이 책을 읽어냈어요" & "이 책을 읽어버렸어요" ?
4
votes
3answers
155 views

If you accidentally use an inappropriate level of politeness, what is the best way to 'recover'?

Let's say I accidentally say "몇 살이에요", "어디 가?", or "밥 만들어줄까?" to a superior, and immediately realise my mistake. What's the best way to recover from the mistake? Should I repeat the sentence using ...
9
votes
2answers
4k views

Is there a difference between 가지고 오다/가다 and 가져가다/가져오다?

As far as I am aware, these forms all mean take/bring (depending on the frame of reference). Is there any difference in meaning or usage between 가지고 오다/가다 and 가져가다/가져오다? Or are they entirely ...
5
votes
4answers
1k views

Compound verbs : Is it possible to generate them, or are they limited to those already commonly known?

Korean contains many compound verbs consisting of two parts: 뛰놀다, meaning to frolic or gambol, comes from 뛰다 (run, jump) and 놀다 (play). 날아다니다, meaning to fly around, combines 날다 (fly), and 다니다 ...
3
votes
2answers
112 views

Are there many (or any) sports idioms in Korean?

Modern English is rich in idioms with their origins in sport - this Wikipedia page gives some examples. Many of these are so ingrained in modern English usage that some people may not be aware of ...
8
votes
1answer
533 views

How to distinguish between unavoidable obligations and strong recommendations?

In English, have to is used for strong obligations. For example, I have the obligation (by the rules of the house) to study when my mother says "You have to study". See here for example. On the other ...
5
votes
1answer
750 views

Usage of -더니 for reason or cause

I am trying to understand how -더니 or ㅆ더니 is used for reason or cause. I read somewhere that ㅆ더니 (as in 잤더니 below) is for talking about yourself. Is it right? I think tense should be considered while ...
5
votes
1answer
380 views

How can I say “You must not do it” as imperative

I learned that the only Korean grammar that can express the meaning "must" : (으)면 안 되다. But I am not so sure if this can mean an absolute "must" in this case as the meaning for it should be "If..., ...
4
votes
2answers
2k views

Korean word for (presentation) slides

I think PowerPoint presentation slides are referred to as "창표" or "장표." However, I can't find it in the dictionary. What's the Korean word I'm thinking of? update: context I have heard this term ...
5
votes
1answer
3k views

What is the difference between 할래요 and 하고 싶어요?

Or more specifically, the difference between V + (으)ㄹ래요 V + 고 싶어요 They both seem to express intention in doing something, equivalent to "I want to do" in English. What is the difference?
6
votes
3answers
7k views

What is the difference between V(으)ㄴ 적이 있다 and V(아/어) 보다?

Both seems to express past experience. For example, 막걸리 마셔 봤어요? Have you tried to drink maggeolli?/Have you ever drunk maggeolli? 서울에 가 봤어요? Have you ever been to Seoul? 생낙지 안 먹어 봤어요 I never never ...
2
votes
1answer
86 views

Does Kakao Talk's ommission of 'ending' forms in auto-completion suggestions correspond with the frequency of usage by Korean native speakers?

As a non-native speaker, I'm often confused, when typing a verb, why sentence-ending forms aren't among the suggestions. For example here, 예쁘다 and 예쁩니다 aren't suggested: and here, 미안합니다 isn't ...
4
votes
3answers
6k views

Why is 'ㅂ' in '박물관' pronounced as /p/ instead of /b/?

I heard the consonant 'ㅂ' in '박물관 (museum)' pronounced /p/ instead of /b/. In some words containing 'ㅂ', I sometimes hear it pronounced /p/ instead of /b/. When does that happen?
5
votes
2answers
95 views

Translation of 'find' in the sense of 'discover' or 'conclude'

'find' in English can have a sense of 'discover' or 'conclude' - we talk about scientific 'findings', or 'finding someone guilty' in a legal setting. In an English sentence like Birds were found ...
4
votes
2answers
327 views

In passive forms, is there any difference between '에' and '에 의해' to denote an actor?

물이 고양이에 의해 엎질러졌어요 – the water was split by the cat. Here, 에 의해 denotes the cause of what happened. However, it seems that we can just use '에' for a similar meaning, e.g. 도둑이 경찰에게 잡혔어요 – the thief was ...
5
votes
1answer
655 views

How general is the pattern N + 당하다?

-당하다 seems to mean to 'suffer' or 'undergo' something. 교통사고에서 사람 다섯 명은 부상을 당했어요 = Five people were injured in the car accident. (link) Here, the pattern is N + 을 당하다. There is another pattern (...
4
votes
1answer
638 views

Is 모자라다 a verb or an adjective

I learned that 모자라다 is an adjective, which means that it should be conjugated as such, e.g., 시간이 모자라서 빨리 빨리 해야돼. 전 모자란 것들이 많은데 열심히 하겠습니다. But on the internet I sometimes find it written with a verb ...
5
votes
1answer
797 views

Are there any ways to make diminutive forms of nouns in Korean?

Many languages have a way to create diminutive forms, which can denote small size, or be a term of endearment. One English example is "-y" : dog becomes doggy, Bob can become Bobby, and so on. In ...
5
votes
2answers
881 views

Are forms such as '감사요', '사랑요', '미안요' slang abbreviations?

I was intrigued to see '감사요' mentioned as an alternative to '감사합니다' in this answer to another question. Would '감사요' be seen as an abbreviation of '감사해요'? Or is it just the noun form '감사' with the ...
7
votes
1answer
3k views

Differentiating 아주, 너무, 매우, 무척

I thought that the first two words can interchangeably be used. However, I realized that there are some words which 아주 has to be used while for the others 매우 used. Example: 아주 좋아요. (매우 is not used) ...
10
votes
1answer
4k views

Are there any particular 'small talk' topics in Korean culture that a learner should be prepared for?

In the UK (where I am based), it's quite common for people who bump into each other in the street to start off a conversation by mentioning the weather. This can then lead into talk about what effects ...
3
votes
1answer
55 views

Is there a word that describes 'words that verb endings can attach to' - i.e. 동사, 형용사, 이다?

A question that occurred to me while asking this one... 동사 (action verbs), 형용사 (adjectives or descriptive verbs), and 이다 (the 'copula') all broadly accept 'verb endings', e.g. 가다 : 갑니다 예쁘다 : ...
6
votes
3answers
432 views

Can the -ㅁ nominalizer ending be attached to all 용언?

As far as I understand, the -ㅁ ending can be added to a verb to make a noun representing a ‘completed’ or ‘embodied’ action. for example: 말하다 means to speak, 말씀 means speech. 만나다 means to meet;...
3
votes
1answer
333 views

Schadenfreude in Korean

As I was trying to explain the concept of Schadenfreude in Korean a few days ago, I began to wonder if there was a specific Korean word that fits this feeling. The ko.wikipedia article just uses a ...
7
votes
1answer
151 views

How do I denote an object in a sentence?

I'm trying to say "Can you clone X?" So far I've gotten this sentence: 복제 할 수 있어요? Which to me sounds like "Can you clone?" But what I really want to say is, Can you clone X?
4
votes
2answers
503 views

Is there any difference in use cases between Hangul and Arabic to express number?

In Korean, it seems that in most of the cases you express number in Hangul, I think. However, there are other cases where you use Arabic numerals, such as: 가족을 2년 동안 못 만났어요. I think it is just a ...
-2
votes
1answer
678 views

Why is 'ㅇ' needed? [closed]

Why do I need to use silent letter ㅇ in word 몽골 (Mongol)? Can I use 모골 instead? In general, when to use ㅇ?
2
votes
1answer
162 views

Why does Google Translate Pronounce '일' like hi'je?

Google pronounces 일 like [hi'je]. But according to what I've read, ㅇ is silent, ㅣis [i] and ㄹ is [r/l] . Shouldn't it be something like [il]?
4
votes
2answers
491 views

What is the right word for nationality in Korean?

In the dictionary, Korean is translated to '한국 사람'. But Google translates it like 'Korea Love'? Do all other nationalities in Korean also end with '사람'?
9
votes
3answers
7k views

What are the differences in usage and meaning between 아름답다, 예쁘다, 이쁘다 and 곱다?

These four words basically means 'beautiful', 'lovely', 'pretty', according to Naver Online Dictionary: 아름답다, 예쁘다, and 곱다. From my own experience, it seems to me that 예쁘다 and 이쁘다 have the same ...
5
votes
2answers
377 views

How to translate 'a fun little distraction'?

How do I translate this phrase into Korean? This mobile game not anything big, just a fun little distraction to pass your time on the subway. Google translate shows that this is 이 모바일 ...
1
vote
2answers
506 views

What does 착 mean when prefixed to a word?

What does 착 mean when prefixed to a word? 발신정지 mean stop outgoing calls (on a mobile phone) 착발신정지 means stop both outgoing and incoming calls Exactly how does 착 function in this case? Are there any ...
4
votes
2answers
4k views

Talking About Hair Color in Korean

I have a question about expressing hair color in Korean. For example, how would I say in Korean that my girlfriend has brown hair? What about saying someone is a red-head, or is blonde?
5
votes
1answer
162 views

Are there contrepèteries (spoonerisms) in Korean?

In France, contrepeteries are a classic class of word plays, where two sounds in a sentence are inverted to produce a new sentence with a different, funny, often saucy meaning. The spelling is ignored,...
4
votes
3answers
153 views

Why do some words show XX-X다 (들어-오다) form in a dictionary?

I wonder why some verbs display its dictionary form as XX-X다 (hyphen in the center). For example, enter in English can be looked up as 들어-오다. At first I thought these verbs should be used in split in ...
6
votes
2answers
1k views

What is the difference between -(어/아/여)야 하다 and -(어/아/여)야 되다?

I have learned that in order to express must/have to in Korean, you use-(어/아/여)야 하다 and -(어/아/여)야 되다 (depending on the verb stem, you might use 어). For example: 너는 밥을 먹어야 한다. vs 밥을 먹어야 된다. (You ...
9
votes
3answers
275 views

Why use 가 in 의사가 되세요?

I'm learning about the usage on (으)세요, but my textbook explains that you cannot use 이다 in (으세요) form. So the following sentence is invalid: 의사이세요 However, the textbook says the correct form is ...
7
votes
3answers
1k views

Why do I need the 이/가 particle when negating the sentence, but not when just stating it?

My textbook ( "Elementary Korean", Tuttle) features the question (where N is a noun) 이것은 N 입니까? along with the following two answers: 네, (그것은) N 입니다 as the translation of "Yes, that is N", as well ...
6
votes
1answer
486 views

Pronunciation rules regarding ㄷ and 이 (palatalization)

I am currently learning with the book "Elementary Korean" by Tuttle. According to the book, when ㅌ appears before 이, it should be pronounced as ㅊ, when it appears at the end of a morpheme or word (...
6
votes
1answer
496 views

What's the adjective for feeling intense cold pain? (while at the dentist)

What's the adjective for feeling intense cold/pain? (while at the dentist) I hear this all the time when I get a dental cleaning, but I haven't been able to find the word in a dictionary. It roughly ...
6
votes
3answers
177 views

Spelling : how can I remember if a consonant is placed as a final '받침' in a block (followed by a null), or as an initial on the next block?

In this question, another user kindly fixed my misspelling - 움지기다 - to the correct form - 움직이다. When I misspell a word using the wrong consonant or vowel, I think - OK, I just have to listen more ...

15 30 50 per page
1
24 25
26
27 28
32