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4
votes
1answer
170 views

Is there a big difference between 하는 것이 좋다 and 하면 좋다?

그 책을 읽는 것이 좋다 그 책을 읽으면 좋다 What's the difference between the 'feel' of these? I've read that 는 것이 좋다 has more of a feel of an instruction - "you should read this book". Is that correct? intuitively ...
4
votes
2answers
2k views

Is '게' exactly the same as '것이'? Is there a wider pattern or is this a specific case?

I've read that '게' is equivalent to '것이'. Is that 100% true? are the following pairs of sentences the same? 그것이 진짜 예뻐요 그게 진짜 예뻐요 그것이 너무 무거워 그게 너무 무거워 I'm also wondering if 것이 → 게 is a case of any ...
5
votes
3answers
127 views

How does general Korean written language differ from text/chat langauge?

I read here earlier that written language is different from modern text/chat language. So much so, that some would consider it difficult to read/understand. Are there any specific cases where you've ...
9
votes
4answers
3k views

How is 시 pronounced?

Is '시' pronounced as 'shi' or 'si'? With 'ㅅ,' I thought it depended on the following character as I've seen it written as 'sh' or 's' For example, 시간 (time) is pronounced as 'shigan' or 'sigan'? I'...
9
votes
1answer
2k views

Why does the name '박' traditionally get romanised to 'Park'?

When Romanising '박', according to this Romanization tool, McCune–Reischauer Romanization and Yale Romanization would produce pak Revised Romanization would produce bak So why does the name '박' ...
4
votes
2answers
1k views

What's the history of the how the word '빵', meaning 'bread', made its way into Korean?

The Wikipedia article on 빵 states that the word is borrowed directly from Japanese, and before that, from Portuguese: From Japanese パン ‎(pan, “bread”), from Portuguese pão ‎(“bread”), from Latin ...
5
votes
1answer
435 views

Etymology for 마찬가지 (just the same)

I have a terrible time remembering 마찬가지. Usually I want to use it and kind of remember what the word sounds like, but I can't remember the exact characters. Perhaps understanding the etymology of ...
3
votes
2answers
2k views

Are there any traditional Korean names that don't have a Chinese character form?

I'm used to seeing that Korean names written in Hangul are counterparts of Chinese character forms - e.g. 권지용 could be represented 权志龙, 박근혜 as 朴槿惠, and so on. Note that here when I say Chinese ...
5
votes
3answers
899 views

Are there any Korean names not in the format [single character family name] - [two character given name]?

Korean names usually seem to be in the format [single character family name] - [two character given name] -e.g. 김민정, 권지용, 박근혜. Are there any names that are not in this format? e.g. are there any ...
7
votes
2answers
6k views

Does howtostudykorean.com really do what it says?

Background How to study Korean. Hmm... I'm interested in learning Korean... I know how to read it... Maybe I'll click on that... 99.9999% of Korean grammar and 9000+ Korean words?! Whoah! That ...
10
votes
6answers
2k views

Books for learning Korean grammar in detail

I have just started learning Korean for about one month. Now I would like to study Korean grammar in detail. Could anyone recommend some books that analyze Korean grammar thoroughly? Maybe books ...
4
votes
2answers
440 views

Can 깨다 and 부수다 be used interchangeably?

What is the difference between these words when used to mean "to break (something)"? Can they be used interchangeably?
3
votes
2answers
319 views

Why does “브금” mean sound track?

I am baffled by this strange word that doesn't show up in the dictionary. "브금" seems to mean sound track. Can someone explain? Also, does "브금" has any relation to "불금"?
3
votes
1answer
240 views

What purposes can the tilde, '~', be used for in informal writing?

In informal messages such as emails between friends, I often see the tilde character after people's names, as if 'calling' them: 민정아 ~ But it seems like it can be put after many other sentences: ...
2
votes
2answers
74 views

Can 가게 앞에 mean both 'at the front of the shop' (inside) and 'in front of the shop'?

In English, if something is 'in front of the shop', it is outside the shop at the front side. If it's 'at the front of the shop', it's at the front side, but could be outside or inside. Can '아이스크림은 ...
4
votes
2answers
4k views

Future tense verb conjugation

What are the different ways of expressing future tense in Korean? When do I use which way? For example, I'm not aware of the difference between 먹을게 and 먹겠다.
3
votes
1answer
439 views

The ancient form of apology 죄송합니다 고어

I often heard a word to apologize in ancient style drama series. Its pronunciation is similar to 송과하옵니다. However the dictionary tells me that 송과 is 松果 which is a fruit. What is the correct spelling ...
4
votes
1answer
704 views

Differentiating 따뜻하다 and 따스하다

Besides 따뜻하다 having an extra usage to describe personality, 따뜻하다 and 따스하다 both mean warm, at least that's what I found in my dictionary. Are these words interchangeable, or do they have nuances/...
6
votes
3answers
4k views

When to use single (ㅅ) or double (ㅆ) consonants?

Is there a rule generally to help remember when we would write double consonants like ㅆ, ㄲ, ㄸ, ㅃ, ㅉ instead of single consonants like ㅅ? For example, remembering to write 땀 for sweat, and not 담. Is ...
12
votes
6answers
2k views

Basic steps to take when learning Korean

Can anyone list basic steps needed to start efficiently learning Korean independently? I do live in a hole geographically, and I highly doubt that I could find a Korean person in a 100 miles radius (...
7
votes
2answers
5k views

Intonations in Korean

Some languages have tones (i.e. intonation rules) by default, for example Mandarin (4), Thai (5), Lao (6), Vitenamese (6), Cantonese (6), etc. Other languages do not have fixed rule on tones, but ...
10
votes
1answer
313 views

Why is this download progress bar worded in the past tense?

This bar, that would be worded as something like '9 seconds remaining' in English, comes up as '9초 남았습니다' - which I would normally translate as something like 'there were 9 seconds left'. Does '았' ...
4
votes
2answers
2k views

Grammar/meaning of 나 봐 / 보나 봐

I sometimes hear this phrase but I don't understand what the grammar/meaning is. It's a construction with 보다, right? I didn't find anything for A/V + 나보다 or 보나보다 or anything like that. Where does it ...
7
votes
3answers
873 views

Distinguishing meanings of A/V + (으)ㄹ 줄 알았다

Consider the sentence 그사람은/저는 운전할 줄 알았어요. I have heard that translated as "I/he/she know/knows how to drive". However, this explanation seems to translate it as "I thought I/he/she would drive". ...
4
votes
2answers
322 views

What's meaning of 혻?

Actually, It used at the first of this sentence: 혻지갑 뒤져서신분증 봤어 But google translate couldn't translate it! Do you know why?
9
votes
5answers
515 views

Country 한자 characters used in headlines

I just ran across the 한자 伊(저 이) used in a headline to mean "Italy". It's the first time I'd seen it, so I was wondering if there are other characters actively used to represent countries in headlines ...
11
votes
1answer
399 views

What do these money-related gestures mean?

The following images come from the Korean manhwa Aura From Another Planet, chapter 35. I can guess that the gestures they are making refer to monetary amounts, but how much are we talking here?
4
votes
1answer
581 views

Expressing “As…”

So the grammatical ending 듯(이) is added after a verb or adjective, and is used to mean "as...". So I have two questions: What is the difference between adding 이 and not adding? My experience in ...
5
votes
1answer
10k views

What kind of cheese is 눈꽃치즈 (snow cheese)?

눈꽃치즈 is typically translated into English as "snow cheese" on Korean menus (and sometimes "Hangulized" as 스노치즈). In most food pictures it just appears to be a very finely shredded, light-colored ...
3
votes
1answer
308 views

By frequency of actual usage, what percentage of the Korean language is 한자어?

The Wikipedia article on Sino-Korean vocabulary states: Sino-Korean words today make up about 60% of the Korean vocabulary, though in actual speech (especially informally) native words are more ...
7
votes
1answer
2k views

What percentage of Korean vocabulary is derived/borrowed from English?

The Wikipedia article on Sino-Korean vocabulary states that Sino-Korean words make up about 60% of the Korean vocabulary (though by frequency of usage, the percentage is lower). Are there any ...
8
votes
2answers
2k views

Why did the Cia cia tribe in Indonesia choose 한 글 for the alphabet?

I heard that this tribe does not have alphabets to write. But instead using ABC, why they using 한 글?
8
votes
1answer
315 views

How to say or suggest in an informal (and possibly rude) way that someone can be disregarded?

Warning: the English language I would like to know of a Korean equivalent for is rude, and contained in the examples below. From this example, we can understand that B wishes to disregard John's ...
3
votes
1answer
1k views

Can the meaning of –고 싶다 be broken down and explained?

I know the basic meaning - 'want' - but I'm wondering what the significance of the compound (2-part) construction is. There are lots of Korean constructions with '-고' meaning 'and', 'then', 'and thus'...
8
votes
1answer
369 views

Is there a special name in Korean for adverbs like '반짝반짝', '흔들흔들', '빙글빙글'?

There seems to be a group of 'doubled' words in Korean that often describe how something looks or moves, e.g. : 반짝반짝 - 'twinkle' or 'sparkle' 흔들흔들 - 'shake' or 'wobble' 빙글빙글 - to go round and ...
3
votes
1answer
666 views

Is there any other verb except 하다 that conjugates with 여?

하 + 여 -> 해 (하여), but most other verbs (in fact, all of the ones I know about, if I'm not mistaken) take 아/어. Is there any other verb that conjugates with 여?
9
votes
1answer
865 views

Verbs that flip their meaning when '이' is inserted (e.g 죽다 vs 죽이다)

There's a pattern in Korean where one verb changes from passive to active or vice versa when '이' is inserted. For example, 죽다 (to die) : 죽이다 (to kill) 먹다 (to eat) : 먹이다 (to feed) 살다 (to live) : 살리다 (...
3
votes
1answer
147 views

Meaning of '지' in 고래는 포유류지 어류 아닙니다

고래는 포우류지 어류 아닙니다 - I've heard that here, 지 is a contrastive (like -지만), so the meaning should be 'A whale is not a fish, but a mammal.' However, I'm more used to '지' meaning 'isn't it?'. So I ...
2
votes
1answer
329 views

Is there any difference between 어/아/여도 '되다', '좋다', and '괜찮다' to ask permission?

It seems that 되다, 좋다, and 괜찮다 can all be used to ask for permission, or whether something is advisable: 담배 피워도 좋습니까? May I smoke? 한국말로 물어도 돼요? May I ask in Korean? 음식이 매워도 괜찮아요? Is it ...
6
votes
1answer
717 views

Besides endic.naver.com, any other good Korean-to-English dictionary site for (hangul) super-newbie learners?

Wiktionary is great for super-newbie learners of Hangul. For example, see this question re: 기계 (gigye) : 기계 (gigye) ==> 機械, 器械, 奇計 (what else?) What's another good Korean-to-English dictionary ...
7
votes
1answer
287 views

기계 (gigye) ==> 機械, 器械, 奇計 (what else?)

en.wiktionary.org is great for Hangul Super- Newbie learners. For example, en.wiktionary.org 기계 gives me 3 Kanji (Hanja) meanings/readings for 기계 (gigye) ==> 機械, 器械, 奇計 ( btw, in Jp ( Japanese ),...
4
votes
1answer
1k views

How would you say “let's” in Korean?

I wanted to translate the following sentence: Let's make a website for remote sensing and photogrammetry real. A native Korean sent me the following information: Korean has two informal ...
6
votes
5answers
440 views

Are there many (or any) 'respectable' acronyms or initialisms in use in modern Korean?

There are lots of English acronyms/initialisms that could not usually be used in a polite or professional context, either because they are rude, or because they are not very well known. Some, though, ...
6
votes
2answers
3k views

How to say “Why not?” in Korean?

"Why not?" is a colloquial stand-alone answer in English. It can expresses An answer to a "why" question, explaining that there is no specific reason. For example, A: Why are you so nice with me ...
5
votes
1answer
3k views

Expressing the word “cold”

So I learnt that there are several words to express the meaning "cold", they include: 춥다, 차갑다, 차다, 시원하다, 쌀쌀하다, 서늘하다, 식다 The first one is no doubt the "cold" that we feel due to weather, the second ...
2
votes
2answers
110 views

How to interpret the text on this “희창기계” (Huichang Machine)?

I found this photograph of a machine (which produces plastic pipes) on Japanese.SE: I know that 기계(gigye, 機械) means 'Machine', but I am unsure how to interpret the other text in "희창기계". (when I ...
4
votes
2answers
449 views

Is it true that government intervention is partly responsible for a decline in hanja usage?

The Wikipedia article on Hangul states that Beginning in the 1970s, hanja began to experience a gradual decline in commercial or unofficial writing in the South due to government intervention......
11
votes
4answers
2k views

Is there a Korean word for 'Syllable Block'?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hangul#Morpho-syllabic_blocks The combinations of 2, 3, 4 (or more?) 자모 are often called 'blocks' in English. As they are an important concept in the way Korean is ...
7
votes
2answers
5k views

Maximum number of characters in a syllable block

I've seen a number of Hangul syllables that contain 4 characters (닭, for example) - is it possible to have syllables with 5 (or even more) characters in them? The Wikipedia page on Hangul suggests it'...
2
votes
1answer
518 views

How can I say “that's her thing”, in the sense of something that someone does well?

A: "Amy's drawing is definitely the best of the competition entries!" B: "Well, art is her thing" To be 'someone's thing' can have a few different meanings, but here it means: it's the thing ...

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