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I've been reading a manhwa using machine translation and I came across a line that goes: "하고싶은대로해...당신이 원하는거면 나는 다 좋으니까"

I understand that the first sentence is "suit yourself" or something to that effect. My problem is with the second sentence.

So, google translates it as "because if that's what you want I am fine".

However, Papago translates it as "because I like everything you want".

I used a Korean dictionary and did my own translation and this is what I arrived at: "Because I am all good, if that’s what you want".

Which is correct? Google makes it sound like the speaker is being indifferent. Given the preceding sentence, one would think that the speaker is indeed indifferent. But the use of 원하다 is apparently polite from what I've heard, which means the speaker is not very indifferent, which would mean Papago's translation is correct.

Which would it be?

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  • It is unclear. Would you provide the context, such as the previous few sentences of the sentence?
    – user67275
    Mar 27, 2023 at 0:07
  • It's really an ambiguous dialogue. Mar 27, 2023 at 0:18
  • To give you more context, it is from the male protagonist said to his girlfriend. Typically he is very loving of her and tries to look out for her. But her recent behavior has been destructive and very much hurting to him. He keeps telling her to stop. But in the end he loses it and excuses himself from the situation. When he does, he tells her this, but with a beaming smile. As if he is happy for her. So I was wondering if he is really supportive or if he is actually dumping her forever.
    – Dinu M
    Mar 27, 2023 at 1:26

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I think you're trying to read too much from machine translators: while they have improved a lot recently, they are still prone to errors, and you can't expect them to correctly infer implicit sentiment.

In particular, just because one machine translator used the word "fine", it doesn't mean the original word (좋으니까) behaves just like "fine" - you can't take the knowledge of how "fine" is used and just plug it back to the original sentence. Different languages, different words.

I think it's possible to speak the original sentence in a way to signal indifference, but by default, it doesn't sound like that. The sentence sounds pretty straightforward to me: it literally means, whatever you want, I'm okay with it (and I don't have any problem with that).

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  • Thank you. To give you more context, it is from the male protagonist said to his girlfriend. Typically he is very loving of her and tries to look out for her. But her recent behavior has been destructive and very much hurting to him. He keeps telling her to stop. But in the end he loses it and excusing himself from the situation. When he does, he tells her this, but with a beaming smile. As if he is happy for her. So I was wondering if he is really supportive or if he is actually dumping her forever.
    – Dinu M
    Mar 27, 2023 at 1:25

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