2

To me it sounds more like 여 (wider mouth) when used at the end of words, while standalone or mid-word 요 is pronounced with a more closed mouth.

Example

https://soundcloud.com/talktomeinkorean/ttmik-level-1-lesson-4#t=10:17

The first time the woman speaker pronounces 잠깐만요, the ending sounds more like 여 to me, but when she splits it into silables it's definitely a 요.

3
  • 2
    Can you post a link to a pronunciation you have heard, where you have had this confusion?
    – user17915
    Mar 18 at 8:31
  • 1
    Maybe I'm an old fart, but judging from the infuriating number of youngsters misspelling -요 as -여 (e.g., 했어여), I think something is going on with the pronunciation of -요 in the younger generation.
    – jick
    Mar 18 at 17:35
  • 2
2

What I feel like about this is that it is possible, but it would be unintentional.

It's easy to slip tongue and not pronounce 요 clearly enough while speaking fast. Especially, 했어요 sounds very much like 했어여 sometimes. (Yeah, I admit it.. it's me.)

However, ordinary native speakers wouldn't consider themselves pronouncing ~요 like ~여 at the end of sentences.

The youtube linke you provided spells everything with -여, instead of -요, but I find it very strange from a native speaker's perspective. (I live in Seoul) Like I said above, native speakers would still consider themselves that they are pronouncing -요, not -여 at the end of the sentence.

However, I admit that the pronunciation of -요 has become vague compared to that in the past. So, it might be that the dialect is actually in the process of changing. The reason I'm saying this is because I've watched a youtube with Seoul dialect in 1990s, and I felt they articulated each syllables much stronger. (Guess what? I was in Seoul back then as well, and I never thought the pronunciation has changed a bit.)

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.