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When can I use 전데요 instead of 접니다? For example my teacher asked "우리 반에 IT 전공 하는 사람 누구예요?". Is it OK to answer "전데요"?

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Adding to @MujjinGun's answer, I don't think "전데요" always has an arguing tone. It depends on your tone and when you use it. For example:

전데요, 왜 물어보세요? It's me. Why do you ask?

전데요, 왜요? It's me. Why?

전데요, 말하세요. It's me. Speak.

When you speak the above examples with rising intonation, of course it would sound argumentative and challenging.

However, there are other context where you use "전데요" in low-pitch falling intonation. For example:

선생님, 전데요. 오늘 아파서 학교 못 갈 거 같아요. Teacher, it's me. I can't go to school today because I am ill.

The context I can think of where it doesn't sound impolite:

(1) when you are not sure,

(2) when you want to ask a favor,

(3) when you did something wrong or there is an awkward situation that you have to explain.

"접니다" is not broadly used by a student when asked a question by a teacher. It sounds too formal. "저요" or "저예요" will be more idiomatic than "접니다" when a teacher asks a question, "우리 반에 IT 전공 하는 사람 누구예요?"

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전데요 has an arguing tone, and it can be quite rude to say to a teacher. Rough translation would be "It's me, what about it?".

접니다 is using formal and polite speech level(하십시오체), and sound much more polite than 전데요.

In addition, 저예요 would be somewhere in between, using polite but informal speech level(해요체)

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  • "전데요 has an arguing tone, and it can be quite rude to say to a teacher." May not be the case. 전데요 is respectful enough to talk to friends, without being rude, and meaning is similar to 저예요, but implying there is something more to say next. It is also only not respectful enough to talk to teacher only. – Incredibly HandSome Samuel Jul 2 '16 at 12:58
  • I don't agree that "전데요" has an arguing tone. It depends on the tone. It is more preferred (1) when you are not sure, (2) you ask a favor or (3) when you did something wrong or there is an awkward situation and you want to start a conversation, etc. For example, "선생님, 전데요, 오늘 아파서 학교 못갈 거 같아요." There is no arguing tone there. In the OP's context, "전데요" could be used when (s)he is not sure whether (s)he should reply or not. – user7 Jul 2 '16 at 13:49
  • @Rathony Would you please add your comment as a complete answer so others will be able to use it? – Hanna Jul 3 '16 at 7:24
  • @Hanna What a coincidence! I just did. – user7 Jul 3 '16 at 7:26

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