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I English, there is a sentence that uses every letter of the (English) alphabet:

The quick brown fox jumped over the lazy dogs (or slight variants of this)

Here is another, more unusual, example of an English pangram (uses all letters):

Sphinx of black quartz, judge my vow.

Are there any such pangrams in Korean?

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I enjoyed the link that @Display-name left in his/her answer, but I thought I would go ahead and display from that large page of Korean what I believe to be the one passage that (is a pangram that can be used to type all the characters to test if a keyboard is fully operational).

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This passage of a question and answer (in 2.1, third bullet from end) uses

  • all 14 consonants 자음 (ㄱ~ㅎ)
  • all 10 vowels 모음 (ㅏ~ㅣ)
  • all "twin" sounds 된소리(ㄲ, ㄸ, ㅃ, ㅆ, ㅉ)
  • the compound vowels 겹홀소리 (ㅐ,ㅒ, ㅔ,ㅖ,ㅘ, ㅙ, ㅚ, ㅝ, ㅞ, ㅟ, ㅢ)

"웬 초콜릿? 제가 원했던 건 뻥튀기 쬐끔과 의류예요." "얘야, 왜 또 불평?" *

The passage would mean:

"Chocolate!? What I wanted was some (조금) rice puffs and clothes." "Child, why are you complaining again?"

  • Note: there is a footnote on this passage indicating that 조금 is technically spelled incorrectly in order to complete this passage with all required elements. It is spelled with the colloquial variant 쬐끔.
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    Note that 쬐끔 is actually a very common colloquial variant of 조금, not just a wild misspelling fabricated to satisfy the conditions. It's just not accepted as an official standard, since there's a rule that two similar words can't be both standard. – MujjinGun Dec 24 '17 at 14:33
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Depends on what you're asking. As you know there are consonants, double consonants, complex consonants, vowels and complex vowels. If you want to write a sentence using all these combinations, it might sound weird (I rarely see multiple complex consonants together).

But here are examples which uses different character combinations; ex: consonant only, consonant and vowels.

Refer to section 2.1

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