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I need help with these 4 North Korean posters:

https://imgur.com/a/3JlXa enter image description here enter image description here enter image description here

I can't even write these letters not to mention to translate them :s

  • Thanks for your question - I've put the pictures themselves in the question. I'll also just quickly link to this meta question in case anyone missed it - in short, we have decided on this site to refrain from political opinions, and stick to discussions of the language. – topo morto Sep 3 '17 at 22:13
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    Also... this should probably be four separate questions. If you wouldn't mind editing this to ask about just one of the posters and asking separate questions about the other 3, I'll put the appropriate Hangul (Korean writing) in the titles of each for you. – topo morto Sep 6 '17 at 7:14
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    Since they're basically all variations on the same theme, wouldn't it make sense to keep them in a single question? I think separating them into four questions would make further discussion harder. (E.g., if one wants to comment about how they sound different from South Korean.) – jick Sep 6 '17 at 19:22
  • @jick if you think so (...and have an answer along those lines in mind?), happy to reopen. – topo morto Sep 6 '17 at 20:24
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    @topomorto i have to agree that i would have translated one of them but walked away from a big list of them. anyway, if posted individually, they could be tagged "north korean propaganda" or even just "propaganda" and thusly grouped with others while being more easily, individually referenced or discussed. – WEBjuju Sep 13 '17 at 17:35
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I'm not an expert on North Korean, but let me take a stab:

  1. 우리 군대 제일주의를 철저히 구현해 나가자

    Let's thoroughly implement the ideology of putting our military first

  2. 선군사상에 기초한 / 조국의 통일독립과 / 일심단결을 철통같이 다져 나가자

    Let's solidify our country's unification (i.e., between the two Koreas), independence, and unity in one mind, based on the military-first doctrine.

    • I believe "선군" means "military first", though I don't think the word is used in South Korean.
  3. 총대를 중시하고 / 선군정치를 하는 한 우리 나라는 끄떡 없다

    As long as we take our gunstock(barrel?) seriously and keep military-first policy, our nation will not fail.

    • "총대" is the long part of a rifle: Naver dictionary says it's called "gunstock" in English. I don't even know how each part of a rifle is called in Korean, much less English, so I don't know what would be the correct word. (It's used metaphorically anyways.)
  4. 원대한 포부와 신심에 넘쳐 / 더 높이 비약하자

    Let's jump higher with aspiring mind and faith.

    • In South Korean, "신심" (a believing mind) is only used in religious contexts, as far as I know. Of course, the poster is clearly not talking about any religion here.

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