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How would I say something like this:

  • Cars are better than bicycles.
  • There are more bicycles than there are cars.
  • Running is faster than walking.
  • Dying is worse than eating breakfast.

Is there any special grammatical form for this?

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Take a look at Korean Comparatives and Superlatives: 더, 보다, 가장/제일. It goes into a lot more detail of various forms, but for your specific examples, they can actually all work with the common A보다 B이/가 더 DV pattern:

Cars are better than bicycles.
자전거보다 자동차가 나아요.

There are more bicycles than there are cars.
자전거보다 자동차가 많아요.

Running is faster than walking.
걷는 것보다 달리기가 빨라요.

Dying is worse than eating breakfast.
아침을 먹는 것보다 죽는 것이 나빠요.

Note, I purposely translated these rather directly and in a grammatically consistent way to display the pattern, so some of them might be slightly awkward, but of course I welcome a native speaker to make any edits.

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    I think the translation is good. One point worth mentioning is that 더 is optional when we already have -보다. In each example sentence above, we can remove 더 and the sentence keeps the same meaning. (This is, of course, in contrast to English where comparisons must be expressed with comparative forms "-er".)
    – jick
    May 25 '17 at 0:54
  • @jick Thanks for checking them, and adding that note about 더. May 25 '17 at 1:53

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