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I am looking for the translation of "There is scarcely any passion without struggle." ("Il n'est guere de passion sans lutte") from The myth of Sisyphus by the French author and philosopher Albert Camus.

Please note that I am not looking for any translation (Google translates it as 투쟁 없이는 열정이 거의 없다.) but an official translation from the Korean version of the book. If there is more than one book translation, any translation from a Korean version of the book would be fine. If it helps, the quote is at the beginning of the second part "The Absurd Man", in the chapter "Don Juanism", in the forth paragraph.

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  • I hope the question is a good fit for this site. It seems to match the tag description at least. – Taladris Feb 21 '17 at 14:44
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    There have been several published translations into Korean by various translators; the earliest I can find is from 1989 by 정애린. – Michaelyus Feb 22 '17 at 14:30
  • @Michaelyus: I didn't imagine there were that much translations. Any version, from academic source or well-reputed editor would be fine for me. If you have a copy of the book, I'd be happy if you had an answer. – Taladris Feb 22 '17 at 14:59
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투쟁없는 열정은 거의 없다. - 알베르 카뮈, 시지프 신화

I tried to find "the translated sentence" trolling the internet. It was difficult to find, so I translated it by myself. The 투쟁, 열정 can be different words according to the context. However, I translated it in general way. Especially, you can easily see 투쟁 and 열정, when you search 알베르 카뮈(Albert Camus).

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  • Thanks. You meant "strolling", right? I googled 투쟁없는 열정이 거의 없다 알베르 카뮈 시지프 신화 and 투쟁 and 열정 seems to appear in the book. But I couldn't find the whole sentence, which is surprising since the sentence is a famous sentence of the book. – Taladris Feb 22 '17 at 7:58
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    @Taladris See merriam-webster.com/dictionary/troll, scroll down and look for transitive verb 1(d): to search in or at trolls flea markets for bargains; also : prowl troll nightclubs – user17915 Jun 26 '17 at 12:18
  • @user17915: I didn't know. Thanks – Taladris Jun 28 '17 at 14:22
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I wonder if we can debate what Camus means in that phrase. I don't have a copy of the writing, so I'll depend on you to help uncover which meaning might be most appropriate.

There is scarcely any passion without struggle.

  1. Passion is most often produced through a struggle.
  2. Within the passion that exists, there is usually inherent struggle.
  3. Usually, those that demonstrate struggle are those that are passionate.

I do like and agree with @ting-choe for meaning #1:

  1. 투쟁없는 열정은 거의 없다

Because I think the phrase may also mean #2, perhaps:

  1. 열정 안에는 원래 투쟁이 있다

And though possibly not where Camus was going, there is the #3 interpretation:

  1. 열정있는 사람은 투쟁을 극복한는 사람이다
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  • I asked for the translation from the Korean version of the book precisely because I wanted to avoid interpretations. That's a key sentence in a philosophy book, so I wish to convey the exact meaning intended by the author. Thank you for the different translations though; that will help my study of Korean. – Taladris Feb 22 '17 at 7:52
  • particularly with a philosopher, there could be various meanings in a single phrase. this is why puns don't translate. the same issue as at work here, assuredly. – 제이 죤스톤 Feb 22 '17 at 12:23
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    But there is assuredly an "official" translation in the Korean translation of the book. The translator chose this specific translation knowing the whole content of the book. – Taladris Feb 22 '17 at 12:34
  • It's interesting that nearly every blog and book report on this seems to quote, "행복한 시지프를 마음속에 그려보지 않으면 안 된다" and not one of them takes interest in the "투쟁없는 열정은 거의 없다". I'm about ready to pay twelve thousand won and buy the book just to find the quote! – 제이 죤스톤 Feb 22 '17 at 13:13
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    "One must imagine Sisyphe happy"! "Il faut imaginer Sisyphe heureux". That's indeed another famous quote from the book, and its last sentence. In French, "Il faut imaginer Sisyphe heureux" has 57,700 search results on Google, whereas "Il n'est guere de passion sans lutte" 444,000 results. That's interesting that different languages/cultures emphasise different quotes. (Both quotes are exact, I have the French book in front of me). – Taladris Feb 22 '17 at 14:56

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